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Conference Paper: Reinforcement of completely decomposed granite with discrete fibres

TitleReinforcement of completely decomposed granite with discrete fibres
Renforcement de granite complètement décomposé avec des morceaux fibres
Authors
KeywordsLaboratory tests
Reinforced soils
Residual soil
Issue Date2013
PublisherPresses des Ponts.
Citation
The 18th International Conference for Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering (ICSMGE 2013), Paris, France, 2-6 September 2013. In Conference Proceedings, 2013, v. 1, p. 2541-2544 How to Cite?
AbstractThe use of discrete fibres as reinforcing material for soils has been researched by many, e.g. Gray and Al-Refeai (1986), Maher and Ho (1994), Crockford et al. (1993), Santoni et al. (2001), Consoli et al. (2009a), but these studies have been generally done independently and have not always been consistent. Silva dos Santos et al. (2010) used data gathered through many years of study to develop a framework of behaviour for a poorly graded quartzitic sand reinforced with polypropylene fibres. In Hong Kong, the construction industry has used reinforcement with continuous fibres for some time, but it is mainly applied to landscaping of otherwise stabilised slopes, for example as a green cover on an existing shotcreted slope. Using randomly distributed short discrete fibres in Hong Kong completely decomposed granite (CDG) could help stabilise the soil while keeping the density low enough to allow growth of vegetation. It is not guaranteed, however, that a well graded residual soil like CDG would behave in the same way as sands used by previous researchers. Laboratory tests have been carried out on completely decomposed granite using short discrete polypropylene fibres as a reinforcing material. The fibres are randomly distributed in the soil. It was found that the fibres increase the unconfined compressive strength of the CDG prepared at its maximum dry density by up to tenfold for fibre contents less than 1%. The behaviour of the fibre-CDG mixture during drained triaxial compression changed from dilative to compressive, with more effects at low confining pressures. These tests seem to indicate that discrete fibres could be considered for improving the performance of CDG.
DescriptionConference Theme: Challenges and Innovations in Geotechnics
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187110

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBangalore, NMen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaudet, BAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-20T12:29:58Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-20T12:29:58Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 18th International Conference for Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering (ICSMGE 2013), Paris, France, 2-6 September 2013. In Conference Proceedings, 2013, v. 1, p. 2541-2544en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187110-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Challenges and Innovations in Geotechnics-
dc.description.abstractThe use of discrete fibres as reinforcing material for soils has been researched by many, e.g. Gray and Al-Refeai (1986), Maher and Ho (1994), Crockford et al. (1993), Santoni et al. (2001), Consoli et al. (2009a), but these studies have been generally done independently and have not always been consistent. Silva dos Santos et al. (2010) used data gathered through many years of study to develop a framework of behaviour for a poorly graded quartzitic sand reinforced with polypropylene fibres. In Hong Kong, the construction industry has used reinforcement with continuous fibres for some time, but it is mainly applied to landscaping of otherwise stabilised slopes, for example as a green cover on an existing shotcreted slope. Using randomly distributed short discrete fibres in Hong Kong completely decomposed granite (CDG) could help stabilise the soil while keeping the density low enough to allow growth of vegetation. It is not guaranteed, however, that a well graded residual soil like CDG would behave in the same way as sands used by previous researchers. Laboratory tests have been carried out on completely decomposed granite using short discrete polypropylene fibres as a reinforcing material. The fibres are randomly distributed in the soil. It was found that the fibres increase the unconfined compressive strength of the CDG prepared at its maximum dry density by up to tenfold for fibre contents less than 1%. The behaviour of the fibre-CDG mixture during drained triaxial compression changed from dilative to compressive, with more effects at low confining pressures. These tests seem to indicate that discrete fibres could be considered for improving the performance of CDG.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPresses des Ponts.-
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the 18th International Conference on Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineeringen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectLaboratory tests-
dc.subjectReinforced soils-
dc.subjectResidual soil-
dc.titleReinforcement of completely decomposed granite with discrete fibresen_US
dc.titleRenforcement de granite complètement décomposé avec des morceaux fibres-
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailBaudet, BA: baudet@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityBaudet, BA=rp01303en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros218217en_US
dc.identifier.volume1-
dc.identifier.spage2541-
dc.identifier.epage2544-
dc.publisher.placeFrance-

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