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Conference Paper: Effect of travel speed on visual control of steering toward a target

TitleEffect of travel speed on visual control of steering toward a target
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
Citation
The 13th Annual Meeting of the Vision Science Society (VSS 2013), Naples, Florida, USA, 10-15 May 2013. In Journal of Vision, 2013, v. 13 n. 9, article no. 947 How to Cite?
AbstractIt has been suggested that travel speed influences the use of visual strategies for the control of self-motion. Here we systematically examined the effect of travel speed on the control of steering toward a target. The display (113°H×89°V) simulated a participant traveling at 2m/s, 8m/s, or 15m/s over a textured ground plane. Participants used a joystick to control the curvature of their travelling path to steer toward a target. Two viewing conditions were tested: in the target fixation condition, the participant's virtual gaze direction was fixed on the target which was placed 10° away from the center of the screen. The target egocentric direction was fixed during steering and was thus unavailable for steering control. In the heading fixation condition, the participant's virtual gaze direction was aligned with heading which was displaced 10° away from the center of the screen. The target egocentric direction changed during steering and was thus available for steering control. Across five participants, mean last second heading error of 10-s steering was similar for the two viewing conditions and decreased significantly from 4.7°±1.5° (mean±SE) to 2.6°±1.0° and 1.7°±0.7° as travel speed increased from 2m/s to 8m/s and 15m/s, respectively. The steering delay was significantly lower at all speeds when target egocentric direction was available for steering. As travel speed increased, observers showed a significant increase in the steering delay when target egocentric cue was available (177±48ms, 210±57ms, and 230±64ms for the three speeds, respectively) but a significant decrease in the steering delay when this cue was unavailable (627±38ms, 557±15ms, and 540±20ms for the three speeds, respectively). We conclude that while high-speed travel does not affect the use of visual strategies for the control of self-motion, people are more accurate and efficient in using optic flow for steering control when travel speed increases.
DescriptionMeeting abstract presented at VSS 2013
Session: Perception and action: Locomotion, navigation
Poster presentation
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187054
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.341
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.042

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorNiehorster, DCen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-20T12:28:43Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-20T12:28:43Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 13th Annual Meeting of the Vision Science Society (VSS 2013), Naples, Florida, USA, 10-15 May 2013. In Journal of Vision, 2013, v. 13 n. 9, article no. 947en_US
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187054-
dc.descriptionMeeting abstract presented at VSS 2013-
dc.descriptionSession: Perception and action: Locomotion, navigation-
dc.descriptionPoster presentation-
dc.description.abstractIt has been suggested that travel speed influences the use of visual strategies for the control of self-motion. Here we systematically examined the effect of travel speed on the control of steering toward a target. The display (113°H×89°V) simulated a participant traveling at 2m/s, 8m/s, or 15m/s over a textured ground plane. Participants used a joystick to control the curvature of their travelling path to steer toward a target. Two viewing conditions were tested: in the target fixation condition, the participant's virtual gaze direction was fixed on the target which was placed 10° away from the center of the screen. The target egocentric direction was fixed during steering and was thus unavailable for steering control. In the heading fixation condition, the participant's virtual gaze direction was aligned with heading which was displaced 10° away from the center of the screen. The target egocentric direction changed during steering and was thus available for steering control. Across five participants, mean last second heading error of 10-s steering was similar for the two viewing conditions and decreased significantly from 4.7°±1.5° (mean±SE) to 2.6°±1.0° and 1.7°±0.7° as travel speed increased from 2m/s to 8m/s and 15m/s, respectively. The steering delay was significantly lower at all speeds when target egocentric direction was available for steering. As travel speed increased, observers showed a significant increase in the steering delay when target egocentric cue was available (177±48ms, 210±57ms, and 230±64ms for the three speeds, respectively) but a significant decrease in the steering delay when this cue was unavailable (627±38ms, 557±15ms, and 540±20ms for the three speeds, respectively). We conclude that while high-speed travel does not affect the use of visual strategies for the control of self-motion, people are more accurate and efficient in using optic flow for steering control when travel speed increases.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visionen_US
dc.titleEffect of travel speed on visual control of steering toward a targeten_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, L: lili@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLi, L=rp00636en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/13.9.947-
dc.identifier.hkuros218528en_US
dc.identifier.volume13-
dc.identifier.issue9-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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