File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Conference Paper: Eye movements for scrambled faces

TitleEye movements for scrambled faces
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Ophthalmology and optometry
Issue Date2013
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
Citation
The 13th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2013), Naples, FL., 10-15 May 2013. In Journal of Vision, 2013, v. 13 n. 9, article 398 How to Cite?
AbstractWe now have considerable evidence on the nature of face perception, and the way in which observers acquire information from intact faces in order to make judgments (e.g., identity, sex, age, ethnicity) about them. However, recent work has shown that faces can often be successfully recognized on the basis of individual features rather than the whole, intact face. Therefore, the goal of the current study was to investigate eye movements when participants were viewing sets of facial features that had been scrambled from their original configuration. Participants viewed scrambled and intact faces, in the context of a recognition memory test (where half the test items had been studied and half were new). During both study and test trials, fixation position was monitored. When presented with scrambled stimuli, fixations were largely centered on the two eyes, with relatively few fixations to the mouth, nose, or other features. With intact stimuli, however, fixations showed a different pattern, with more fixations to the nose and mouth (as well as to the eyes). We attribute this difference in eye movement patterns between intact and scrambled faces to the influence of the overall facial configuration in the former case. When facial features appear in the context of the intact facial configuration, the visual system is able to efficiently acquire information from across the whole face. Once the features are scrambled, however, observers appear to use a much more restricted focus of attention, which they position mainly on the eyes. These results also suggest that observers use a relatively small number of features as the basis for recognition decisions about scrambled faces.
DescriptionPoster Session - Face perception: Inversion, eye movements, gaze perception: no. 26.508
Open Access Journal
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187049
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.341
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.042

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHayward, WGen_US
dc.contributor.authorLao, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Zen_US
dc.contributor.authorCrookes, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, TTen_US
dc.contributor.authorCaldara, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-20T12:28:42Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-20T12:28:42Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 13th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2013), Naples, FL., 10-15 May 2013. In Journal of Vision, 2013, v. 13 n. 9, article 398en_US
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187049-
dc.descriptionPoster Session - Face perception: Inversion, eye movements, gaze perception: no. 26.508-
dc.descriptionOpen Access Journal-
dc.description.abstractWe now have considerable evidence on the nature of face perception, and the way in which observers acquire information from intact faces in order to make judgments (e.g., identity, sex, age, ethnicity) about them. However, recent work has shown that faces can often be successfully recognized on the basis of individual features rather than the whole, intact face. Therefore, the goal of the current study was to investigate eye movements when participants were viewing sets of facial features that had been scrambled from their original configuration. Participants viewed scrambled and intact faces, in the context of a recognition memory test (where half the test items had been studied and half were new). During both study and test trials, fixation position was monitored. When presented with scrambled stimuli, fixations were largely centered on the two eyes, with relatively few fixations to the mouth, nose, or other features. With intact stimuli, however, fixations showed a different pattern, with more fixations to the nose and mouth (as well as to the eyes). We attribute this difference in eye movement patterns between intact and scrambled faces to the influence of the overall facial configuration in the former case. When facial features appear in the context of the intact facial configuration, the visual system is able to efficiently acquire information from across the whole face. Once the features are scrambled, however, observers appear to use a much more restricted focus of attention, which they position mainly on the eyes. These results also suggest that observers use a relatively small number of features as the basis for recognition decisions about scrambled faces.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visionen_US
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.subjectOphthalmology and optometry-
dc.titleEye movements for scrambled facesen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailHayward, WG: whayward@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHayward, WG=rp00630en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/13.9.398-
dc.identifier.hkuros217084en_US
dc.identifier.volume13en_US
dc.identifier.issue9-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 131003-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats