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Conference Paper: Neuropsychological functioning of nonapneic snoring Hong Kong Chinese

TitleNeuropsychological functioning of nonapneic snoring Hong Kong Chinese
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe American Academy of Sleep Medicine. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalsleep.org
Citation
The 27th Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC (APSS), Baltimore, MD., 1-5 June 2013. In Sleep, 2013, v. 36 abstract suppl., p. A149, abstract no. 0427 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: The STOP-bang questionnaire has been well validated as a screening tool for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in general surgery patients, but not in bariatric surgery (BS) patients. In our previous study, the STOP-bang score of ≥ 3 showed a high sensitivity (96%), but low specificity (20%) in BS patients. We hypothesize that a higher score is needed to diagnose OSA in BS patients. Methods: This is a retrospective study of consecutive subjects who had a sleep study prior to BS. All subjects answered the STOP-bang questionnaire prior to their sleep study. Subjects currently treated with positive airway pressure therapy were excluded. The sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio for STOP-bang scores of 4 to 7 were calculated. Results: A total of 59 patients were included in the study. The prevalence of OSA in the BS population was 84%. The sensitivity/specificity for STOP-bang scores of ≥4 along with AHI>5, AHI>15 and AHI>30 was 82/60%, 85/40%, and 90/34%, respectively. The sensitivity/specificity of STOP-bang score of ≥5 for AHI>5, AHI>15 and AHI>30 was 59/90%, 68/72%, and 76/63%, respectively. The sensitivity/specificity of STOP-bang score of ≥6 for AHI>5, AHI>15 and AHI>30 was 33/100%, 41/92%, and 52/87%, respectively. The sensitivity of STOP-bang score of ≥7 for AHI>5, AHI>15 and AHI>30 was 14/100%, 21/100%, and 33/100%, respectively. The OSA likelihood ratio (LR) for STOP-bang scores of 4 or 5 with an AHI>5 were 2.05 and 5.9, respectively, whereas for scores ≥6 the LRs were infinite. All patients with a STOP-bang score ≥6 had OSA, and all patients with STOP-bang scores ≥7 had severe OSA. Conclusion: Higher STOP-Bang score cut-off values progressively improved their predictive power of detecting OSA in BS patients. A STOPbang score ≥5 in BS patients is associated with OSA with a post-test probability of 97%.
DescriptionClinical Sleep Science: Session I. Sleep Disorders - Breathing
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/186831
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.793
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.606

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYeung, AWMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, EYYen_US
dc.contributor.authorIp, MSMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMCen_US
dc.contributor.authorEskes, GAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-20T12:21:10Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-20T12:21:10Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 27th Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC (APSS), Baltimore, MD., 1-5 June 2013. In Sleep, 2013, v. 36 abstract suppl., p. A149, abstract no. 0427en_US
dc.identifier.issn0161-8105-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/186831-
dc.descriptionClinical Sleep Science: Session I. Sleep Disorders - Breathing-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The STOP-bang questionnaire has been well validated as a screening tool for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in general surgery patients, but not in bariatric surgery (BS) patients. In our previous study, the STOP-bang score of ≥ 3 showed a high sensitivity (96%), but low specificity (20%) in BS patients. We hypothesize that a higher score is needed to diagnose OSA in BS patients. Methods: This is a retrospective study of consecutive subjects who had a sleep study prior to BS. All subjects answered the STOP-bang questionnaire prior to their sleep study. Subjects currently treated with positive airway pressure therapy were excluded. The sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio for STOP-bang scores of 4 to 7 were calculated. Results: A total of 59 patients were included in the study. The prevalence of OSA in the BS population was 84%. The sensitivity/specificity for STOP-bang scores of ≥4 along with AHI>5, AHI>15 and AHI>30 was 82/60%, 85/40%, and 90/34%, respectively. The sensitivity/specificity of STOP-bang score of ≥5 for AHI>5, AHI>15 and AHI>30 was 59/90%, 68/72%, and 76/63%, respectively. The sensitivity/specificity of STOP-bang score of ≥6 for AHI>5, AHI>15 and AHI>30 was 33/100%, 41/92%, and 52/87%, respectively. The sensitivity of STOP-bang score of ≥7 for AHI>5, AHI>15 and AHI>30 was 14/100%, 21/100%, and 33/100%, respectively. The OSA likelihood ratio (LR) for STOP-bang scores of 4 or 5 with an AHI>5 were 2.05 and 5.9, respectively, whereas for scores ≥6 the LRs were infinite. All patients with a STOP-bang score ≥6 had OSA, and all patients with STOP-bang scores ≥7 had severe OSA. Conclusion: Higher STOP-Bang score cut-off values progressively improved their predictive power of detecting OSA in BS patients. A STOPbang score ≥5 in BS patients is associated with OSA with a post-test probability of 97%.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe American Academy of Sleep Medicine. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalsleep.org-
dc.relation.ispartofSleepen_US
dc.titleNeuropsychological functioning of nonapneic snoring Hong Kong Chineseen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLau, EYY: eyylau@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailIp, MSM: msmip@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, TMC: tmclee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLau, EYY=rp00634en_US
dc.identifier.authorityIp, MSM=rp00347en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, TMC=rp00564en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros219019en_US
dc.identifier.volume36-
dc.identifier.issueabstract suppl.-
dc.identifier.spageA149, abstract no. 0427-
dc.identifier.epageA149, abstract no. 0427-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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