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Conference Paper: The Role of Milk and Dairy Products in Childhood Obesity: Evidence from the Hong Kong's 'Children of 1997' Birth Cohort

TitleThe Role of Milk and Dairy Products in Childhood Obesity: Evidence from the Hong Kong's 'Children of 1997' Birth Cohort
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherBMJ Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/
Citation
The 19th IEA World Congress of Epidemiology, Edinburgh, Scotland, 7-11 August 2011. In Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, 2011, v. 65 suppl.1, p. A16, abstract no. O1-5.3 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction Observational studies, mainly from western populations, suggest that dairy product consumption is inversely associated with adiposity. However, in such populations, there is a limited range of dairy product intake while dietary intake and obesity share social patterning making evidence from non-western developed settings valuable in distinguishing whether the observed associations are biologically mediated or socially confounded. Methods We used multivariable linear regression to examine the adjusted association of the frequency of milk or other dairy product consumption at 11 years with clinically measured body mass index (BMI) z-scores at about 13 years, relative to the 2007 WHO growth reference in a large (n=8327), population-representative Chinese birth cohort, comprising 88% of all births in Hong Kong in April and May 1997. Results Of the original 8327 cohort members, 7933 are alive, participating and living in Hong Kong. At approximately 13 years, 7488 had clinically assessed BMI. Socio-economic position was positively associated with frequency of milk and other dairy product consumption. Neither milk nor other dairy product consumption was associated with BMI z-score (milk −0.02, 95% CI −0.06 to 0.03 and dairy products 0.03, 95% CI −0.01 to 0.07), adjusted for sex, mother's birthplace, highest parental education, pubertal stage, physical activity and other food consumption. Conclusions In a non-western setting, milk and other dairy product consumption was not associated with adiposity, suggesting that any observed anti-obesigenic effects in western settings may be due to socially patterned confounding by socio-economic position.
DescriptionConference Theme: Changing populations, changing diseases: Epidemiology for Tomorrow’s World
Free papers: 1.5 Chronic Disease: Nutrition
This journal suppl. contain programme and abstracts of the IEA World Congress of Epidemiology, 2011
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/186706
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.865
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.890
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLin, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorTarrant, AMen_US
dc.contributor.authorHui, LLen_US
dc.contributor.authorKwok, MKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-20T12:18:03Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-20T12:18:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 19th IEA World Congress of Epidemiology, Edinburgh, Scotland, 7-11 August 2011. In Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, 2011, v. 65 suppl.1, p. A16, abstract no. O1-5.3en_US
dc.identifier.issn0143-005X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/186706-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Changing populations, changing diseases: Epidemiology for Tomorrow’s World-
dc.descriptionFree papers: 1.5 Chronic Disease: Nutrition-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. contain programme and abstracts of the IEA World Congress of Epidemiology, 2011-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction Observational studies, mainly from western populations, suggest that dairy product consumption is inversely associated with adiposity. However, in such populations, there is a limited range of dairy product intake while dietary intake and obesity share social patterning making evidence from non-western developed settings valuable in distinguishing whether the observed associations are biologically mediated or socially confounded. Methods We used multivariable linear regression to examine the adjusted association of the frequency of milk or other dairy product consumption at 11 years with clinically measured body mass index (BMI) z-scores at about 13 years, relative to the 2007 WHO growth reference in a large (n=8327), population-representative Chinese birth cohort, comprising 88% of all births in Hong Kong in April and May 1997. Results Of the original 8327 cohort members, 7933 are alive, participating and living in Hong Kong. At approximately 13 years, 7488 had clinically assessed BMI. Socio-economic position was positively associated with frequency of milk and other dairy product consumption. Neither milk nor other dairy product consumption was associated with BMI z-score (milk −0.02, 95% CI −0.06 to 0.03 and dairy products 0.03, 95% CI −0.01 to 0.07), adjusted for sex, mother's birthplace, highest parental education, pubertal stage, physical activity and other food consumption. Conclusions In a non-western setting, milk and other dairy product consumption was not associated with adiposity, suggesting that any observed anti-obesigenic effects in western settings may be due to socially patterned confounding by socio-economic position.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Epidemiology & Community Healthen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Epidemiology & Community Health. Copyright © BMJ Publishing Group.-
dc.rightsThis article has been accepted for publication in Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. The definitive copyedited, typeset version in Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, 2011, v. 65 n. Suppl.1, p. abstract no. O1-5.3 is available online at: http://jech.bmjjournals.com/-
dc.titleThe Role of Milk and Dairy Products in Childhood Obesity: Evidence from the Hong Kong's 'Children of 1997' Birth Cohorten_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailTarrant, AM: tarrantm@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailHui, LL: huic@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailKwok, MK: maggiek@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTarrant, AM=rp00461en_US
dc.identifier.authorityHui, LL=rp01698en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_US
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jech.2011.142976a.38-
dc.identifier.hkuros218127en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros196085-
dc.identifier.volume65-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl.1-
dc.identifier.spageA16, abstract no. O1-5.3-
dc.identifier.epageA16, abstract no. O1-5.3-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000293901800039-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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