File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
  • Find via Find It@HKUL
Supplementary

Conference Paper: Microbiological characteristics of Sri Lankan tea-laborers without oral hygiene performance

TitleMicrobiological characteristics of Sri Lankan tea-laborers without oral hygiene performance
Authors
KeywordsMicrobiology
Periodontal disease and oral microbiome
Issue Date2012
PublisherSage Publications, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925
Citation
Annual Meeting of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) Southeast Asian Division, 3-4 November 2012. In Journal of Dental Research, 2012, v. 91, Special Issue C, abstract no. 168829 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: (1) To survey the subgingival microbiota of Sri Lankan tea workers who had not performed oral hygiene ever, and (2) to compare the bacterial profiles present within deep versus shallow pockets using culture-independent 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Methods: 64 subgingival plaque samples from 32 subjects were selected for analysis. For each subject, 1 site with PPD≤3mm and 1 site with PPD≥6mm were chosen for sampling using sterile paper points. DNA was then extracted and the 16S rRNA gene was PCR-amplified with the universal primer pair D88 and E94. The amplified genes were then TOPO-cloned, sequenced and analyzed. Results: 1,955 plasmid clones were sequenced, yielding 1,887 16S rRNA sequences of ca. 1,500bp suitable for analysis (920 sequences for deep pockets, and 967 for shallow sites). A total of 9 phyla and 67 genera were identified, with Firmicutes(69.9%), Proteobacteria(16.3%) and Fusobacteria(7.9%) as the 3 most abundant phyla. 318 operational taxonomic units(OTUs) were identified applying 98% sequence identity cutoff. 558 clones(30%) representing 189 OTUs corresponded to novel phylotypes. The remaining 70% clones (n=1,329) represented 129 known species, 73% (n=94) of which were uncultivable species. The estimated richness (Chao1 estimator) was 567.48 (95%CI: 478.62-705.49). The diversity (Shannon index) was 4.82 (95%CI: 4.76-4.88). ­­­­­­­­213 and 187 OTUs were identified in the deep and shallow subgingival communities, respectively. The Chao1 estimator was 381 (95%CI: 314-494) for deep and 280 (95%CI: 240-352) for shallow community. The diversity was 4.53(deep) and 4.46(shallow). Significant differences were found in the composition of the microbiota between the two communities using LibShuff (p<0.001). Conclusions: Culture-independent 16S rRNA-based analysis gave significant insight into the diversity and richness of subgingival microbiota in a cohort without any oral hygiene intervention. The microbiota in deep sites was significantly more diverse and more complex than in shallow sites, indicating that host response may not be site-specific. This abstract is based on research that was funded entirely or partially by an outside source: Clinical Research Foundation, Brienz, Switzerland
DescriptionSession: Microbiology/Immunology
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/186529
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.602
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.714

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhuang, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorWatt, RMen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorLang-Hua, BHen_US
dc.contributor.authorSteiner, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorRamseier, CAen_US
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-20T12:12:17Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-20T12:12:17Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationAnnual Meeting of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) Southeast Asian Division, 3-4 November 2012. In Journal of Dental Research, 2012, v. 91, Special Issue C, abstract no. 168829en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-0345-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/186529-
dc.descriptionSession: Microbiology/Immunology-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: (1) To survey the subgingival microbiota of Sri Lankan tea workers who had not performed oral hygiene ever, and (2) to compare the bacterial profiles present within deep versus shallow pockets using culture-independent 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Methods: 64 subgingival plaque samples from 32 subjects were selected for analysis. For each subject, 1 site with PPD≤3mm and 1 site with PPD≥6mm were chosen for sampling using sterile paper points. DNA was then extracted and the 16S rRNA gene was PCR-amplified with the universal primer pair D88 and E94. The amplified genes were then TOPO-cloned, sequenced and analyzed. Results: 1,955 plasmid clones were sequenced, yielding 1,887 16S rRNA sequences of ca. 1,500bp suitable for analysis (920 sequences for deep pockets, and 967 for shallow sites). A total of 9 phyla and 67 genera were identified, with Firmicutes(69.9%), Proteobacteria(16.3%) and Fusobacteria(7.9%) as the 3 most abundant phyla. 318 operational taxonomic units(OTUs) were identified applying 98% sequence identity cutoff. 558 clones(30%) representing 189 OTUs corresponded to novel phylotypes. The remaining 70% clones (n=1,329) represented 129 known species, 73% (n=94) of which were uncultivable species. The estimated richness (Chao1 estimator) was 567.48 (95%CI: 478.62-705.49). The diversity (Shannon index) was 4.82 (95%CI: 4.76-4.88). ­­­­­­­­213 and 187 OTUs were identified in the deep and shallow subgingival communities, respectively. The Chao1 estimator was 381 (95%CI: 314-494) for deep and 280 (95%CI: 240-352) for shallow community. The diversity was 4.53(deep) and 4.46(shallow). Significant differences were found in the composition of the microbiota between the two communities using LibShuff (p<0.001). Conclusions: Culture-independent 16S rRNA-based analysis gave significant insight into the diversity and richness of subgingival microbiota in a cohort without any oral hygiene intervention. The microbiota in deep sites was significantly more diverse and more complex than in shallow sites, indicating that host response may not be site-specific. This abstract is based on research that was funded entirely or partially by an outside source: Clinical Research Foundation, Brienz, Switzerland-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dental Researchen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Dental Research. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc..-
dc.subjectMicrobiology-
dc.subjectPeriodontal disease and oral microbiome-
dc.titleMicrobiological characteristics of Sri Lankan tea-laborers without oral hygiene performanceen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailWatt, RM: rmwatt@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWang, R: wangren@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP: nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWatt, RM=rp00043en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros219838en_US
dc.identifier.volume91-
dc.identifier.issueSpecial Issue C-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats