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Article: Collective Action in Apartment Building Management in Hong Kong

TitleCollective Action in Apartment Building Management in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsCollective action
Common pool resource
Building management
Apartment building
Property management company
Issue Date2013
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/habitatint
Citation
Habitat International, 2013, v. 38, p. 10-17 How to Cite?
AbstractWith the expansion of the world's population, apartment buildings have become popular, especially in metropolitan areas all over the world. Although apartment buildings could economize on the use of land, they may generate collective action problems among owners in the building management process, resulting in a “tragedy of the commons” in the urban environment. However, in the literature, there has been a lack of research that has investigated collective action problems in building management. In order to fill the gap, this study surveys collective action in apartment building management and proposes to utilize the institutional analysis and development (IAD) framework to analyze their problems. Making references to the literature on collective action and drawing from studies of common-pool resource management in particular, this paper classifies collective management actions into four categories, namely: 1) rules design, 2) rules enforcement, 3) maintenance decision making, and 4) performance monitoring. It further illustrates the application of the IAD model by empirically investigating a specific collective action—the appointment of a property management company (PMC). By using the logistic regression model for 2989 single block residential apartment buildings in 18 districts in Hong Kong, this paper will show that building condition, building location, the number of owners, and the presence of an owners' organization each have a different impact on a property's likelihood of appointing a PMC. The results of this paper should shed light on both collective action theory and building management. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/186231
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.029
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.038
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, DCWen_US
dc.contributor.authorGao, Wen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-20T12:00:28Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-20T12:00:28Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationHabitat International, 2013, v. 38, p. 10-17en_US
dc.identifier.issn0197-3975-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/186231-
dc.description.abstractWith the expansion of the world's population, apartment buildings have become popular, especially in metropolitan areas all over the world. Although apartment buildings could economize on the use of land, they may generate collective action problems among owners in the building management process, resulting in a “tragedy of the commons” in the urban environment. However, in the literature, there has been a lack of research that has investigated collective action problems in building management. In order to fill the gap, this study surveys collective action in apartment building management and proposes to utilize the institutional analysis and development (IAD) framework to analyze their problems. Making references to the literature on collective action and drawing from studies of common-pool resource management in particular, this paper classifies collective management actions into four categories, namely: 1) rules design, 2) rules enforcement, 3) maintenance decision making, and 4) performance monitoring. It further illustrates the application of the IAD model by empirically investigating a specific collective action—the appointment of a property management company (PMC). By using the logistic regression model for 2989 single block residential apartment buildings in 18 districts in Hong Kong, this paper will show that building condition, building location, the number of owners, and the presence of an owners' organization each have a different impact on a property's likelihood of appointing a PMC. The results of this paper should shed light on both collective action theory and building management. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/habitatinten_US
dc.relation.ispartofHabitat Internationalen_US
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Habitat International. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Habitat International, [VOL 38, 2013] DOI 10.1016/j.habitatint.2012.09.001-
dc.subjectCollective action-
dc.subjectCommon pool resource-
dc.subjectBuilding management-
dc.subjectApartment building-
dc.subjectProperty management company-
dc.titleCollective Action in Apartment Building Management in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, DCW: danielho@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHo, DCW=rp01001en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.habitatint.2012.09.001-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84866876209-
dc.identifier.hkuros218520en_US
dc.identifier.volume38en_US
dc.identifier.spage10en_US
dc.identifier.epage17en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000315831600002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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