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Article: Individual level antecedents of psychological empowerment

TitleIndividual level antecedents of psychological empowerment
Authors
KeywordsCultural values
Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM)
Psychological empowerment
Quality of relationships
Status
Issue Date2013
PublisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pubs.asce.org/journals/me.html
Citation
Journal of Management in Engineering, 2013, p. article no.04014036 How to Cite?
AbstractThe role of individual factors in organizational behavior has been debated since the 1960s and remains unresolved. Psychological empowerment has been portrayed as holding the key to unleashing individual potential for performance improvement in project settings, yet individuals with values at variance with the principles of empowerment may not be suitable candidates. The relationship between seven factors related to an individual’s cultural values, status, and quality of relationships and psychological empowerment are explored with a sample of project management-level staff in Hong Kong using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM). Results indicate that individual-level factors matter in psychological empowerment experiences in project settings. In particular, culture may be a key boundary condition in making the implementation of empowerment acceptable and effective in different contexts—although the specific influence of cultural values such as power distance, uncertainty avoidance, and collectivism/individualism still requires further research to confirm. Building quality relationships between leaders and subordinates, and between subordinates themselves, emerges as a viable root to enhancing psychological empowerment on projects. The study supports findings from cross-cultural studies that show differences in empowerment effects across cultures, and so casts doubts on the convergence hypothesis of management practices across cultures. Building robust social support systems may, however, be fundamental to the successful implementation of empowerment in high power distance and high uncertainty avoidance contexts such as that of Hong Kong and China. Read More: http://ascelibrary.org/doi/abs/10.1061/(ASCE)ME.1943-5479.0000239
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/186221
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.84
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.060

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTuuli, MMen_US
dc.contributor.authorRowlinson, SMen_US
dc.contributor.authorFellows, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, AMMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-20T12:00:25Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-20T12:00:25Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Management in Engineering, 2013, p. article no.04014036en_US
dc.identifier.issn0742-597X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/186221-
dc.description.abstractThe role of individual factors in organizational behavior has been debated since the 1960s and remains unresolved. Psychological empowerment has been portrayed as holding the key to unleashing individual potential for performance improvement in project settings, yet individuals with values at variance with the principles of empowerment may not be suitable candidates. The relationship between seven factors related to an individual’s cultural values, status, and quality of relationships and psychological empowerment are explored with a sample of project management-level staff in Hong Kong using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM). Results indicate that individual-level factors matter in psychological empowerment experiences in project settings. In particular, culture may be a key boundary condition in making the implementation of empowerment acceptable and effective in different contexts—although the specific influence of cultural values such as power distance, uncertainty avoidance, and collectivism/individualism still requires further research to confirm. Building quality relationships between leaders and subordinates, and between subordinates themselves, emerges as a viable root to enhancing psychological empowerment on projects. The study supports findings from cross-cultural studies that show differences in empowerment effects across cultures, and so casts doubts on the convergence hypothesis of management practices across cultures. Building robust social support systems may, however, be fundamental to the successful implementation of empowerment in high power distance and high uncertainty avoidance contexts such as that of Hong Kong and China. Read More: http://ascelibrary.org/doi/abs/10.1061/(ASCE)ME.1943-5479.0000239-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pubs.asce.org/journals/me.html-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Management in Engineeringen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Management in Engineering. Copyright © American Society of Civil Engineers.-
dc.subjectCultural values-
dc.subjectHierarchical linear modeling (HLM)-
dc.subjectPsychological empowerment-
dc.subjectQuality of relationships-
dc.subjectStatus-
dc.titleIndividual level antecedents of psychological empowermenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailRowlinson, SM: hrecsmr@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLiu, AMM: ammliu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityRowlinson, SM=rp01020en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLiu, AMM=rp01432en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1061/(ASCE)ME.1943-5479.0000239-
dc.identifier.hkuros218083en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros226175-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no.04014036-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no.04014036-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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