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Article: Disk Degeneration and Low Back Pain: Are They Fat-Related Conditions?

TitleDisk Degeneration and Low Back Pain: Are They Fat-Related Conditions?
Authors
Issue Date2013
Citation
Global Spine Journal, 2013, v. 3 n. 3, p. 133-144 How to Cite?
AbstractLow back pain (LBP) is the world's most debilitating condition. Disk degeneration has been regarded as a strong determinant associated with LBP. Overweight and obesity are public health concerns that affect every population worldwide and whose prevalence continues to rise. Studies have indicated strong associations between overweight/obesity and disk degeneration as well as with LBP. This broad narrative review article addresses the various mechanisms that may be involved leading to disk degeneration and/or LBP in the setting of overweight/obesity. In particular, our goal is to raise awareness of the role of fat cells and their involvement via altered metabolism or the release of adipokines as well as other pathways that may lead to the development of disk degeneration and LBP. Understanding the role of fat in this process may aid in the development of novel biological therapies and technologies to halt the progression or regenerate the disk. Moreover, with genetic advancements and the appreciation of genetic epidemiology, a more personalized approach to spine care may have to consider the role of fat in any preventative, therapeutic, and/or prognosis modalities toward the disk and LBP.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/186106
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.108
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSamartzis, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorKarppinen, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, JPYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLotz, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-20T11:54:53Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-20T11:54:53Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationGlobal Spine Journal, 2013, v. 3 n. 3, p. 133-144en_US
dc.identifier.issn2192-5682-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/186106-
dc.description.abstractLow back pain (LBP) is the world's most debilitating condition. Disk degeneration has been regarded as a strong determinant associated with LBP. Overweight and obesity are public health concerns that affect every population worldwide and whose prevalence continues to rise. Studies have indicated strong associations between overweight/obesity and disk degeneration as well as with LBP. This broad narrative review article addresses the various mechanisms that may be involved leading to disk degeneration and/or LBP in the setting of overweight/obesity. In particular, our goal is to raise awareness of the role of fat cells and their involvement via altered metabolism or the release of adipokines as well as other pathways that may lead to the development of disk degeneration and LBP. Understanding the role of fat in this process may aid in the development of novel biological therapies and technologies to halt the progression or regenerate the disk. Moreover, with genetic advancements and the appreciation of genetic epidemiology, a more personalized approach to spine care may have to consider the role of fat in any preventative, therapeutic, and/or prognosis modalities toward the disk and LBP.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofGlobal Spine Journalen_US
dc.titleDisk Degeneration and Low Back Pain: Are They Fat-Related Conditions?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSamartzis, D: dspine@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, JPY: cheungjp@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySamartzis, D=rp01430en_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, JPY=rp01685en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1055/s-0033-1350054-
dc.identifier.pmid24436864-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3854598-
dc.identifier.hkuros220152en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros237993-
dc.identifier.hkuros256016-
dc.identifier.volume3en_US
dc.identifier.spage133en_US
dc.identifier.epage144en_US

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