File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: The self is that which gets lost in translation: A sociolinguistic view of Chinese poetry translation through modernity & parataxis

TitleThe self is that which gets lost in translation: A sociolinguistic view of Chinese poetry translation through modernity & parataxis
Authors
KeywordsAvant-Garde
Parataxis/Hypotaxis
Self
Transcendence/Immanence
Translation
Issue Date2012
Citation
Forum For World Literature Studies, 2012, v. 4 n. 1, p. 165-185 How to Cite?
AbstractHow has the translation of Chinese poetry into English contributed to the reconsideration of the self - or "the lyric ego" - in contemporary and avant-garde Anglophone poetry? Examining the micro-history of avant-garde English presentations of Chinese poetry, and the shifting configuration of China in the politico-economic sphere and the Anglophone imaginary over the last hundred years, this paper will offer a socio-linguistic reflection on the notion of the self. Specifically, I will approach the divergence between so-called "avant-garde" and "Unmarked Case" (my term for "establishment" or "mainstream") poetic communities by interrogating whether such a distinction is sociological or linguistic. Through the lens of Chinese poetry translation, I will trace the development of "Classical" Chinese poetry in English translation from its former association with English experimentation (Pound, Rexroth, Snyder, etc.) to being upheld by stalwarts of "Official Verse Culture" (Milosz, Merwin, Wright, Young, etc.), leaving avant-gardists (Hejinian, Padgett, Waldrop, etc.) to entertain their current predilection for the contemporary in Chinese poetry. This examination will yield conclusions both about our definitions of "modernity" and "tradition" as well as about how we deploy language and rhetoric to signify those concepts. Finally, looking at the few current poetic avant-gardists - John Cayley, Kit Kelen, Jonathan Stalling, and Jeffrey Yang - who work both with modern and pre-modern Chinese poetry, I will conclude with an appeal for a view of translation that can work to reconcile the socio-linguistic divisions between the avant-garde and the "unmarked. ".
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/185501
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.100
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKlein, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-30T07:42:58Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-30T07:42:58Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationForum For World Literature Studies, 2012, v. 4 n. 1, p. 165-185en_US
dc.identifier.issn1949-8519en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/185501-
dc.description.abstractHow has the translation of Chinese poetry into English contributed to the reconsideration of the self - or "the lyric ego" - in contemporary and avant-garde Anglophone poetry? Examining the micro-history of avant-garde English presentations of Chinese poetry, and the shifting configuration of China in the politico-economic sphere and the Anglophone imaginary over the last hundred years, this paper will offer a socio-linguistic reflection on the notion of the self. Specifically, I will approach the divergence between so-called "avant-garde" and "Unmarked Case" (my term for "establishment" or "mainstream") poetic communities by interrogating whether such a distinction is sociological or linguistic. Through the lens of Chinese poetry translation, I will trace the development of "Classical" Chinese poetry in English translation from its former association with English experimentation (Pound, Rexroth, Snyder, etc.) to being upheld by stalwarts of "Official Verse Culture" (Milosz, Merwin, Wright, Young, etc.), leaving avant-gardists (Hejinian, Padgett, Waldrop, etc.) to entertain their current predilection for the contemporary in Chinese poetry. This examination will yield conclusions both about our definitions of "modernity" and "tradition" as well as about how we deploy language and rhetoric to signify those concepts. Finally, looking at the few current poetic avant-gardists - John Cayley, Kit Kelen, Jonathan Stalling, and Jeffrey Yang - who work both with modern and pre-modern Chinese poetry, I will conclude with an appeal for a view of translation that can work to reconcile the socio-linguistic divisions between the avant-garde and the "unmarked. ".en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofForum for World Literature Studiesen_US
dc.subjectAvant-Gardeen_US
dc.subjectParataxis/Hypotaxisen_US
dc.subjectSelfen_US
dc.subjectTranscendence/Immanenceen_US
dc.subjectTranslationen_US
dc.titleThe self is that which gets lost in translation: A sociolinguistic view of Chinese poetry translation through modernity & parataxisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailKlein, L: lklein@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityKlein, L=rp01768en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84861535050en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84861535050&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume4en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage165en_US
dc.identifier.epage185en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKlein, L=35317780100en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats