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Article: Fouling of nanofiltration, reverse osmosis, and ultrafiltration membranes by protein mixtures: The role of inter-foulant-species interaction

TitleFouling of nanofiltration, reverse osmosis, and ultrafiltration membranes by protein mixtures: The role of inter-foulant-species interaction
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/est
Citation
Environmental Science And Technology, 2011, v. 45 n. 15, p. 6373-6379 How to Cite?
AbstractProtein fouling of nanofiltration (NF), reverse osmosis (RO), and ultrafiltration (UF) membranes by bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LYS), and their mixture was investigated under cross-flow conditions. The effect of solution chemistry, membrane properties, and permeate flux level was systematically studied. When the solution pH was within the isoelectric points (IEPs) of the two proteins (i.e., pH 4.7-10.4), the mixed protein system experienced more severe flux decline compared to the respective single protein systems, which may be attributed to the electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged BSA and positively charged LYS molecules. Unlike a typical single protein system, membrane fouling by BSA-LYS mixture was only weakly dependent on solution pH within this pH range, and increased ionic strength was found to enhance the membrane flux as a result of the suppressed BSA-LYS electrostatic attraction. Membrane fouling was likely controlled by foulant-fouled-membrane interaction under severe fouling conditions (elevated flux level and unfavorable solution chemistry that promotes fouling), whereas it was likely dominated by foulant-clean-membrane interaction under mild fouling conditions. Compared to nonporous NF and RO membranes, the porous UF membrane was more susceptible to dramatic flux decline due to the increased risk of membrane pore plugging. This study reveals that membrane fouling by mixed macromolecules may behave very differently from that by typical single foulant system, especially when the inter-foulant-species interaction dominates over the intra-species interaction in the mixed foulant system. © 2011 American Chemical Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/185405
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.393
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.664
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, YNen_US
dc.contributor.authorTang, CYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-30T07:32:19Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-30T07:32:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Science And Technology, 2011, v. 45 n. 15, p. 6373-6379en_US
dc.identifier.issn0013-936Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/185405-
dc.description.abstractProtein fouling of nanofiltration (NF), reverse osmosis (RO), and ultrafiltration (UF) membranes by bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LYS), and their mixture was investigated under cross-flow conditions. The effect of solution chemistry, membrane properties, and permeate flux level was systematically studied. When the solution pH was within the isoelectric points (IEPs) of the two proteins (i.e., pH 4.7-10.4), the mixed protein system experienced more severe flux decline compared to the respective single protein systems, which may be attributed to the electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged BSA and positively charged LYS molecules. Unlike a typical single protein system, membrane fouling by BSA-LYS mixture was only weakly dependent on solution pH within this pH range, and increased ionic strength was found to enhance the membrane flux as a result of the suppressed BSA-LYS electrostatic attraction. Membrane fouling was likely controlled by foulant-fouled-membrane interaction under severe fouling conditions (elevated flux level and unfavorable solution chemistry that promotes fouling), whereas it was likely dominated by foulant-clean-membrane interaction under mild fouling conditions. Compared to nonporous NF and RO membranes, the porous UF membrane was more susceptible to dramatic flux decline due to the increased risk of membrane pore plugging. This study reveals that membrane fouling by mixed macromolecules may behave very differently from that by typical single foulant system, especially when the inter-foulant-species interaction dominates over the intra-species interaction in the mixed foulant system. © 2011 American Chemical Society.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/esten_US
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Science and Technologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBiofoulingen_US
dc.subject.meshCattleen_US
dc.subject.meshHydrogen-Ion Concentrationen_US
dc.subject.meshMembranes, Artificialen_US
dc.subject.meshMuramidase - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshNanotechnology - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshOsmolar Concentrationen_US
dc.subject.meshOsmosisen_US
dc.subject.meshSerum Albumin, Bovine - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshSolutionsen_US
dc.subject.meshUltrafiltration - Methodsen_US
dc.titleFouling of nanofiltration, reverse osmosis, and ultrafiltration membranes by protein mixtures: The role of inter-foulant-species interactionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTang, CY: tangc@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTang, CY=rp01765en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/es2013177en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21678956-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79960951457en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79960951457&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume45en_US
dc.identifier.issue15en_US
dc.identifier.spage6373en_US
dc.identifier.epage6379en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000293196400028-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, YN=35076853300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, CY=35489259800en_US

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