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Conference Paper: ICT initiatives in primary education: a built environment research challenge

TitleICT initiatives in primary education: a built environment research challenge
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherBirmingham School of the Built Environment, Birmingham City University.
Citation
The Joint CIB International Symposium of W055, W065, W089, W118, TG76, TG78, TG81 AND TG84, Montreal, Canada, 26 – 29 June 2012. In Management of Construction: Research to Practice (MCRP) Conference Proceedings, 2012, v. 2, p. 1051-1061 How to Cite?
AbstractThe last decade has seen an array of ICT initiatives in education aiming at decreasing inequality and digital exclusion. The One Laptop per Child (OLPC) project provides children in developing countries with Internet connected laptops free of charge. As part of this project, Uruguay is the first country to provide every public primary school child with a laptop through the Plan Ceibal. The Plan represents a major investment to promote digital literacy and improve the quality of education. However, several conflicts arise when new technologies are introduced into the educational system. Amongst these is how the introduction of new tools and changes in pedagogical approaches conflict with existing school facilities. There is little current knowledge about what an integrated approach to operating, maintaining, improving and adapting the school buildings and infrastructure in order to create a supporting environment might look like. This paper reports on a research project initiated to explore and unravel the tensions that the introduction of laptops pose, and establish the different ways in which these can be alleviated. Empirical data is drawn from an ongoing multiple case study of five public primary schools. Particular attention is given to how school facilities and their immediate surroundings mediate the successful introduction and adoption of individual laptops. We argue for a context sensitive view on research that not only considers potential changes in pedagogical approaches, but also the physical environments in which these changes are supposed to take place.
DescriptionConference Theme: Research to Practice
Session: Fresh Perspectives on Construction Innovation (TG76 Special Track)
The Conference Proceedings can be viewed at: http://mcrp2012.pbworks.com/w/file/fetch/60797844/MCRP%20Proceedings%20Volume%202.pdf
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/185210
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCardellino, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeiringer, RTFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-15T10:43:22Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-15T10:43:22Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Joint CIB International Symposium of W055, W065, W089, W118, TG76, TG78, TG81 AND TG84, Montreal, Canada, 26 – 29 June 2012. In Management of Construction: Research to Practice (MCRP) Conference Proceedings, 2012, v. 2, p. 1051-1061en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9782981335517-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/185210-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Research to Practice-
dc.descriptionSession: Fresh Perspectives on Construction Innovation (TG76 Special Track)-
dc.descriptionThe Conference Proceedings can be viewed at: http://mcrp2012.pbworks.com/w/file/fetch/60797844/MCRP%20Proceedings%20Volume%202.pdf-
dc.description.abstractThe last decade has seen an array of ICT initiatives in education aiming at decreasing inequality and digital exclusion. The One Laptop per Child (OLPC) project provides children in developing countries with Internet connected laptops free of charge. As part of this project, Uruguay is the first country to provide every public primary school child with a laptop through the Plan Ceibal. The Plan represents a major investment to promote digital literacy and improve the quality of education. However, several conflicts arise when new technologies are introduced into the educational system. Amongst these is how the introduction of new tools and changes in pedagogical approaches conflict with existing school facilities. There is little current knowledge about what an integrated approach to operating, maintaining, improving and adapting the school buildings and infrastructure in order to create a supporting environment might look like. This paper reports on a research project initiated to explore and unravel the tensions that the introduction of laptops pose, and establish the different ways in which these can be alleviated. Empirical data is drawn from an ongoing multiple case study of five public primary schools. Particular attention is given to how school facilities and their immediate surroundings mediate the successful introduction and adoption of individual laptops. We argue for a context sensitive view on research that not only considers potential changes in pedagogical approaches, but also the physical environments in which these changes are supposed to take place.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBirmingham School of the Built Environment, Birmingham City University.-
dc.relation.ispartofManagement of Construction: Research to Practice (MCRP) Conference Proceedingsen_US
dc.titleICT initiatives in primary education: a built environment research challengeen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLeiringer, RTF: roine.leiringer@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeiringer, RTF=rp01592en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros215252en_US
dc.identifier.volume2-
dc.identifier.spage1051en_US
dc.identifier.epage1061en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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