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Conference Paper: Law against humanity in Peter Chan Ho-sun’s Wu Xia

TitleLaw against humanity in Peter Chan Ho-sun’s Wu Xia
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherUniversity of London.
Citation
The 16th Annual Meeting of the Association for the Study of Law, Culture & the Humanities (ASLCH 2013), University of London, Birkbeck, UK., 22-23 March 2013. In Conference Ptogramme, 2013, p. 127 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper explores the cinematic treatment of law, justice, morality and human relationships in Wu Xia (2011). Wu Xia is not just another Hong Kong martial arts film; in fact, it has only three fight scenes and is dialogue heavy. From its stunningly detailed visual recreation of a Chinese rural village in 1917, its incorporation of medicine and physics in its action elements, to a refusal to infuse black and white morality in its character development, the film stands out in its realism. The paper argues that the film ridicules a legalistic approach to justice and places the practice of law at opposite extremes with humanity. I will analyse its jurisprudential musings about free will, punishment and blame attribution for human behaviour. Since the film is a mainland Chinese-Hong Kong co-production, I will also compare the language used in the two different versions released in Hong Kong and mainland China and interpret the contrasts in their respective social, political and historical contexts.
DescriptionSession 3: 7.11 Portraying the Human: Panelist 1
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/185189

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-15T10:39:46Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-15T10:39:46Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 16th Annual Meeting of the Association for the Study of Law, Culture & the Humanities (ASLCH 2013), University of London, Birkbeck, UK., 22-23 March 2013. In Conference Ptogramme, 2013, p. 127en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/185189-
dc.descriptionSession 3: 7.11 Portraying the Human: Panelist 1-
dc.description.abstractThis paper explores the cinematic treatment of law, justice, morality and human relationships in Wu Xia (2011). Wu Xia is not just another Hong Kong martial arts film; in fact, it has only three fight scenes and is dialogue heavy. From its stunningly detailed visual recreation of a Chinese rural village in 1917, its incorporation of medicine and physics in its action elements, to a refusal to infuse black and white morality in its character development, the film stands out in its realism. The paper argues that the film ridicules a legalistic approach to justice and places the practice of law at opposite extremes with humanity. I will analyse its jurisprudential musings about free will, punishment and blame attribution for human behaviour. Since the film is a mainland Chinese-Hong Kong co-production, I will also compare the language used in the two different versions released in Hong Kong and mainland China and interpret the contrasts in their respective social, political and historical contexts.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of London.-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnual Meeting of the Association for the Study of Law, Culture & the Humanities, ASLCH 2013en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleLaw against humanity in Peter Chan Ho-sun’s Wu Xiaen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, J: hiuchi@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, J=rp01168en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros216114en_US
dc.identifier.spage127-
dc.identifier.epage127-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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