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Conference Paper: Contract specificity and supplier performance in China: the contingent roles of institutional environments

TitleContract specificity and supplier performance in China: the contingent roles of institutional environments
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherAcademy of International Business. The Journal's web site is located at http://aib.msu.edu/publications/confproceed.asp
Citation
The 55th Annual Meeting of the Academy of International Business (AIB 2013), Istanbul, Turkey, 3-6 July 2013. In Academy of International Business Annual Meeting Proceedings, 2013, p. 111 How to Cite?
AbstractHow does contracting function in emerging economies in which legal institutions are underdeveloped but guanxi norms are highly pervasive? Building on transaction cost economics and institutional theory, this study untangles two distinct facets of contracting, task specificity and contingency specificity and examines their contingent effects on exchange performance given different levels of legal inadequacy and guanxi importance. The results from a survey of 307 manufacturer–supplier dyads in China show that task specificity is overall more effective than contingency specificity at promoting exchange performance. However, its role declines when legal support is inadequate and when guanxi becomes prevalent within transactional environment. Contingency specificity is only useful when guanxi is important; it is not helpful when legal is inadequate.
DescriptionConference Theme: Bridging the Divide: Linking IB to Complementary Disciplines and Practice
Session: 2.1.14 - Interactive ; Track: 7 - Emerging Economies: Firm Growth and Performance in Emerging Markets
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/185118
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Qen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhou, KZen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-15T10:31:51Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-15T10:31:51Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 55th Annual Meeting of the Academy of International Business (AIB 2013), Istanbul, Turkey, 3-6 July 2013. In Academy of International Business Annual Meeting Proceedings, 2013, p. 111en_US
dc.identifier.issn2078-0435-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/185118-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Bridging the Divide: Linking IB to Complementary Disciplines and Practice-
dc.descriptionSession: 2.1.14 - Interactive ; Track: 7 - Emerging Economies: Firm Growth and Performance in Emerging Markets-
dc.description.abstractHow does contracting function in emerging economies in which legal institutions are underdeveloped but guanxi norms are highly pervasive? Building on transaction cost economics and institutional theory, this study untangles two distinct facets of contracting, task specificity and contingency specificity and examines their contingent effects on exchange performance given different levels of legal inadequacy and guanxi importance. The results from a survey of 307 manufacturer–supplier dyads in China show that task specificity is overall more effective than contingency specificity at promoting exchange performance. However, its role declines when legal support is inadequate and when guanxi becomes prevalent within transactional environment. Contingency specificity is only useful when guanxi is important; it is not helpful when legal is inadequate.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademy of International Business. The Journal's web site is located at http://aib.msu.edu/publications/confproceed.asp-
dc.relation.ispartofAcademy of International Business Annual Meeting Proceedingsen_US
dc.titleContract specificity and supplier performance in China: the contingent roles of institutional environmentsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailZhou, KZ: kevinz@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZhou, KZ=rp01127en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros215951en_US
dc.identifier.spage111-
dc.identifier.epage111-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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