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Article: Attributing variance in supportive care needs during cancer: Culture-service, and individual differences, before clinical factors

TitleAttributing variance in supportive care needs during cancer: Culture-service, and individual differences, before clinical factors
Authors
Issue Date2013
Citation
PLoS One, 2013, v. 8 n. 5, p. e65099 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground Studies using the Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS) report high levels of unmet supportive care needs (SCNs) in psychological and less-so physical & daily living domains, interpreted as reflecting disease/treatment-coping deficits. However, service and culture differences may account for unmet SCNs variability. We explored if service and culture differences better account for observed SCNs patterns. Methods Hong Kong (n = 180), Taiwanese (n = 263) and Japanese (n = 109) CRC patients’ top 10 ranked SCNS-34 items were contrasted. Mean SCNS-34 domain scores were compared by sample and treatment status, then adjusted for sample composition, disease stage and treatment status using multivariate hierarchical regression. Results All samples were assessed at comparable time-points. SCNs were most prevalent among Japanese and least among Taiwanese patients. Japanese patients emphasized Psychological (domain mean = 40.73) and Health systems and information (HSI) (38.61) SCN domains, whereas Taiwanese and Hong Kong patients emphasized HSI (27.41; 32.92) and Patient care & support (PCS) (19.70; 18.38) SCN domains. Mean Psychological domain scores differed: Hong Kong = 9.72, Taiwan = 17.84 and Japan = 40.73 (p<0.03–0.001, Bonferroni). Other SCN domains differed only between Chinese and Japanese samples (all p<0.001). Treatment status differentiated Taiwanese more starkly than Hong Kong patients. After adjustment, sample origin accounted for most variance in SCN domain scores (p<0.001), followed by age (p = 0.01–0.001) and employment status (p = 0.01–0.001). Treatment status and Disease stage, though retained, accounted for least variance. Overall accounted variance remained low. Conclusions Health service and/or cultural influences, age and occupation differences, and less so clinical factors, differentially account for significant variation in published studies of SCNs.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/184806
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, WWTen_US
dc.contributor.authorShun, SCen_US
dc.contributor.authorOkuyama, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorLai, YHen_US
dc.contributor.authorWada, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorAkechi, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, WYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-15T10:10:18Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-15T10:10:18Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One, 2013, v. 8 n. 5, p. e65099en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/184806-
dc.description.abstractBackground Studies using the Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS) report high levels of unmet supportive care needs (SCNs) in psychological and less-so physical & daily living domains, interpreted as reflecting disease/treatment-coping deficits. However, service and culture differences may account for unmet SCNs variability. We explored if service and culture differences better account for observed SCNs patterns. Methods Hong Kong (n = 180), Taiwanese (n = 263) and Japanese (n = 109) CRC patients’ top 10 ranked SCNS-34 items were contrasted. Mean SCNS-34 domain scores were compared by sample and treatment status, then adjusted for sample composition, disease stage and treatment status using multivariate hierarchical regression. Results All samples were assessed at comparable time-points. SCNs were most prevalent among Japanese and least among Taiwanese patients. Japanese patients emphasized Psychological (domain mean = 40.73) and Health systems and information (HSI) (38.61) SCN domains, whereas Taiwanese and Hong Kong patients emphasized HSI (27.41; 32.92) and Patient care & support (PCS) (19.70; 18.38) SCN domains. Mean Psychological domain scores differed: Hong Kong = 9.72, Taiwan = 17.84 and Japan = 40.73 (p<0.03–0.001, Bonferroni). Other SCN domains differed only between Chinese and Japanese samples (all p<0.001). Treatment status differentiated Taiwanese more starkly than Hong Kong patients. After adjustment, sample origin accounted for most variance in SCN domain scores (p<0.001), followed by age (p = 0.01–0.001) and employment status (p = 0.01–0.001). Treatment status and Disease stage, though retained, accounted for least variance. Overall accounted variance remained low. Conclusions Health service and/or cultural influences, age and occupation differences, and less so clinical factors, differentially account for significant variation in published studies of SCNs.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS Oneen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleAttributing variance in supportive care needs during cancer: Culture-service, and individual differences, before clinical factorsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R: fielding@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, WWT: wwtlam@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityFielding, R=rp00339en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, WWT=rp00443en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0065099-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3669056-
dc.identifier.hkuros215135en_US
dc.identifier.volume8en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spagee65099en_US
dc.identifier.epagee65099en_US

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