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Article: More market-oriented than United States and more socialist than China: a comparative public property story of Singapore

TitleMore market-oriented than United States and more socialist than China: a comparative public property story of Singapore
Authors
KeywordsPublic Property
Private Property
Market Mechanism
Efficiency
Corruption
Issue Date2014
PublisherUniversity of Washington, School of Law. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.law.washington.edu/PacRim
Citation
Pacific Rim Law & Policy Journal, 2014, v. 23, p. 1-55 How to Cite?
AbstractCompared to the more illustrious conceptualization of private property, the conceptualization of public property remains at a surprisingly infantile stage. The very definition of public property is ambiguous. This article utilizes a comparative case study of traffic congestion policies in the United States, China, and Singapore to highlight the conceptual pitfalls posed by the current confusion on public property. This article proposes a refined public property framework that offers greater conceptual clarity on the real issues at stake. In particular, this article argues that “property” in public property should include regulatory permits while “public” in public property should not be distracted by the requirement of public access. The allocation considerations of efficiency and fairness governing conventional public property are equally applicable to economically valuable regulatory permits. Similarly, public access is a mere form of allocation that should be changed upon alterations in use pattern arising from technological advancement and socioeconomic changes.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/184527
ISSN
SSRN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorCui, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-15T09:53:22Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-15T09:53:22Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationPacific Rim Law & Policy Journal, 2014, v. 23, p. 1-55en_US
dc.identifier.issn1066-8632-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/184527-
dc.description.abstractCompared to the more illustrious conceptualization of private property, the conceptualization of public property remains at a surprisingly infantile stage. The very definition of public property is ambiguous. This article utilizes a comparative case study of traffic congestion policies in the United States, China, and Singapore to highlight the conceptual pitfalls posed by the current confusion on public property. This article proposes a refined public property framework that offers greater conceptual clarity on the real issues at stake. In particular, this article argues that “property” in public property should include regulatory permits while “public” in public property should not be distracted by the requirement of public access. The allocation considerations of efficiency and fairness governing conventional public property are equally applicable to economically valuable regulatory permits. Similarly, public access is a mere form of allocation that should be changed upon alterations in use pattern arising from technological advancement and socioeconomic changes.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Washington, School of Law. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.law.washington.edu/PacRimen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPacific Rim Law & Policy Journalen_US
dc.subjectPublic Property-
dc.subjectPrivate Property-
dc.subjectMarket Mechanism-
dc.subjectEfficiency-
dc.subjectCorruption-
dc.titleMore market-oriented than United States and more socialist than China: a comparative public property story of Singaporeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChen, J: jianlin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChen, J=rp01530en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros215918en_US
dc.identifier.volume23-
dc.identifier.spage1-
dc.identifier.epage55-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.ssrn2391624-
dc.identifier.hkulrp2014/006-

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