File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Human Serum Promotes Candida albicans Biofilm growth and Virulence Gene Expression on Silicone Biomaterial

TitleHuman Serum Promotes Candida albicans Biofilm growth and Virulence Gene Expression on Silicone Biomaterial
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
PLoS One, 2013, v. 8 n. 5, p. e62902 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives Systemic candidal infections are a common problem in hospitalized patients due to central venous catheters fabricated using silicone biomaterial (SB). We therefore evaluated the effect of human serum on C. albicans biofilm morphology, growth, and the expression of virulence-related genes on SB in vitro. Methods We cultivated C. albicans SC5314 (wild-type strain, WT) and its derivative HLC54 (hyphal mutant, HM) for 48 h in various conditions, including the presence or absence of SB discs, and human serum. The growth of planktonic and biofilm cells of both strains was monitored at three time points by a tetrazolium salt reduction assay and by scanning electron microscopy. We also analyzed by RT-PCR its expression of the virulence-related genes ALS3, HWP1, EAP1, ECE1, SAP1 - SAP10, PLB1, PLB2, PLC and PLD. Results At each time point, planktonic cells of WT strain cultured in yeast nitrogen base displayed a much higher expression of EAP1 and HWP1, and a moderately higher ALS3 expression, than HM cells. In planktonic cells, expression of the ten SAP genes was higher in the WT strain initially, but were highly expressed in the HM strain by 48 h. Biofilm growth of both strains on SB was promoted in the presence of human serum than in its absence. Significant upregulation of ALS3, HWP1, EAP1, ECE1, SAP1, SAP4, SAP6 - SAP10, PLB1, PLB2 and PLC was observed for WT biofilms grown on serum-treated SB discs for at least one time point, compared with biofilms on serum-free SB discs. Conclusions Human serum stimulates C. albicans biofilm growth on SB discs and upregulates the expression of virulence genes, particularly adhesion genes ALS3 and HWP1, and hydrolase-encoding genes SAP, PLB1 and PLB2. This response is likely to promote the colonization of this versatile pathogen within the human host.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/184416
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, YHen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BPKen_US
dc.contributor.authorYau, JYYen_US
dc.contributor.authorYeung, SKWen_US
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-15T09:45:30Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-15T09:45:30Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One, 2013, v. 8 n. 5, p. e62902en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/184416-
dc.description.abstractObjectives Systemic candidal infections are a common problem in hospitalized patients due to central venous catheters fabricated using silicone biomaterial (SB). We therefore evaluated the effect of human serum on C. albicans biofilm morphology, growth, and the expression of virulence-related genes on SB in vitro. Methods We cultivated C. albicans SC5314 (wild-type strain, WT) and its derivative HLC54 (hyphal mutant, HM) for 48 h in various conditions, including the presence or absence of SB discs, and human serum. The growth of planktonic and biofilm cells of both strains was monitored at three time points by a tetrazolium salt reduction assay and by scanning electron microscopy. We also analyzed by RT-PCR its expression of the virulence-related genes ALS3, HWP1, EAP1, ECE1, SAP1 - SAP10, PLB1, PLB2, PLC and PLD. Results At each time point, planktonic cells of WT strain cultured in yeast nitrogen base displayed a much higher expression of EAP1 and HWP1, and a moderately higher ALS3 expression, than HM cells. In planktonic cells, expression of the ten SAP genes was higher in the WT strain initially, but were highly expressed in the HM strain by 48 h. Biofilm growth of both strains on SB was promoted in the presence of human serum than in its absence. Significant upregulation of ALS3, HWP1, EAP1, ECE1, SAP1, SAP4, SAP6 - SAP10, PLB1, PLB2 and PLC was observed for WT biofilms grown on serum-treated SB discs for at least one time point, compared with biofilms on serum-free SB discs. Conclusions Human serum stimulates C. albicans biofilm growth on SB discs and upregulates the expression of virulence genes, particularly adhesion genes ALS3 and HWP1, and hydrolase-encoding genes SAP, PLB1 and PLB2. This response is likely to promote the colonization of this versatile pathogen within the human host.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.actionen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS Oneen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleHuman Serum Promotes Candida albicans Biofilm growth and Virulence Gene Expression on Silicone Biomaterialen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1932-6203&volume=8&issue=5&spage=e62902&epage=&date=2013&atitle=Human+Serum+Promotes+Candida+albicans+Biofilm+growth+and+Virulence+Gene+Expression+on+Silicone+Biomaterialen_US
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, YH: hema@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, BPK: bpkcheun@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYau, JYY: yaujyy@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYeung, SKW: skwyeung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP: lakshman@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, YH=rp00025en_US
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, LP=rp00023en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0062902-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3660551-
dc.identifier.hkuros215089en_US
dc.identifier.volume8en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spagee62902en_US
dc.identifier.epagee62902en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats