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Article: Gender, age, and educational-attainment differences in Australian adults’ participation in vigorous sporting and fitness activities

TitleGender, age, and educational-attainment differences in Australian adults’ participation in vigorous sporting and fitness activities
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherHuman Kinetics. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.humankinetics.com/JPAH
Citation
Journal of Physical Activity & Health, 2004, v. 1 n. 4, p. 377-388 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground:Participation in regular vigorous physical activity could confer health benefits additional to those derived from moderate-intensity physical activities that are currently the focus of public health strategies. Methods: Sociodemographic differences in reported participation in vigorous sporting and fitness activities over the past 2 weeks were examined using cross-sectional data from an Australian urban population sample. Results:Participation at least once in any form of vigorous physical activity and regular participation (six or more sessions) both decreased across successive age groups and from high to low levels of education. The most frequently reported types of vigorous physical activity were cycling (13.3%), jogging (10.1%), swimming (8.4%) for men; and, swimming (8.9%), cycling (8.8%) and aerobics (8.6%) for women. Conclusion:Rates of regular participation in vigorous activities were low. Interventions might focus on ways to encourage younger adults to engage more regularly in these activities and to maintain participation through the lifespan.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/184302
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.884
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.905

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeslie, E-
dc.contributor.authorCerin, E-
dc.contributor.authorGore, CJ-
dc.contributor.authorGeorge, A-
dc.contributor.authorBauman, A-
dc.contributor.authorOwen, N-
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-05T07:28:33Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-05T07:28:33Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Physical Activity & Health, 2004, v. 1 n. 4, p. 377-388-
dc.identifier.issn1543-3080-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/184302-
dc.description.abstractBackground:Participation in regular vigorous physical activity could confer health benefits additional to those derived from moderate-intensity physical activities that are currently the focus of public health strategies. Methods: Sociodemographic differences in reported participation in vigorous sporting and fitness activities over the past 2 weeks were examined using cross-sectional data from an Australian urban population sample. Results:Participation at least once in any form of vigorous physical activity and regular participation (six or more sessions) both decreased across successive age groups and from high to low levels of education. The most frequently reported types of vigorous physical activity were cycling (13.3%), jogging (10.1%), swimming (8.4%) for men; and, swimming (8.9%), cycling (8.8%) and aerobics (8.6%) for women. Conclusion:Rates of regular participation in vigorous activities were low. Interventions might focus on ways to encourage younger adults to engage more regularly in these activities and to maintain participation through the lifespan.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherHuman Kinetics. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.humankinetics.com/JPAH-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Physical Activity & Health-
dc.titleGender, age, and educational-attainment differences in Australian adults’ participation in vigorous sporting and fitness activitiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.volume1-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage377-
dc.identifier.epage388-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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