File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Serum proteomic fingerprints of adult patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome

TitleSerum proteomic fingerprints of adult patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherAmerican Association for Clinical Chemistry, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.clinchem.org
Citation
Clinical Chemistry, 2006, v. 52 n. 3, p. 421-429 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an emerging infectious disease caused by a new coronavirus strain, SARS-CoV. Specific proteomic patterns might be present in serum in response to the infection and could be useful for early detection of the disease. Methods: Using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization (SELDI) ProteinChip technology, we profiled and compared serum proteins of 39 patients with early-stage SARS infection and 39 non-SARS patients who were suspected cases during the SARS outbreak period. Proteomic patterns associated with SARS were identified by bioinformatic and biostatistical analyses. Features of interest were then purified and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Twenty proteomic features were significantly different between the 2 groups. Fifteen were increased in the SARS group, and 5 were decreased. Their concentrations were correlated with 2 or more clinical and/or biochemical variables. Two were correlated with the SARS-CoV viral load. Hierarchical clustering analysis showed that a majority of the SARS patients (95%) had similar serum proteomic profiles and identified 2 subgroups with poor prognosis. ROC curve analysis identified individual features as potential biomarkers for SARS diagnosis (areas under ROC curves, 0.733-0.995). ROC curve areas were largest for an N-terminal fragment of complement C3c α chain (m/z 28 119) and an internal fragment of fibrinogen α-E chain (m/z 5908). Immunoglobulin κ light chain (m/z 24 505) positively correlated with viral load. Conclusions: Specific proteomic fingerprints in the sera of adult SARS patients could be used to identify SARS cases early during onset with high specificity and sensitivity. © 2006 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/184290
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.457
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.472
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPang, RTKen_US
dc.contributor.authorPoon, TCWen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, KCAen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, NLSen_US
dc.contributor.authorChiu, RWKen_US
dc.contributor.authorTong, YKen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, RMYen_US
dc.contributor.authorChim, SSCen_US
dc.contributor.authorNgai, SMen_US
dc.contributor.authorSung, JJYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLo, YMDen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-04T06:10:52Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-04T06:10:52Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Chemistry, 2006, v. 52 n. 3, p. 421-429en_US
dc.identifier.issn0009-9147en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/184290-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an emerging infectious disease caused by a new coronavirus strain, SARS-CoV. Specific proteomic patterns might be present in serum in response to the infection and could be useful for early detection of the disease. Methods: Using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization (SELDI) ProteinChip technology, we profiled and compared serum proteins of 39 patients with early-stage SARS infection and 39 non-SARS patients who were suspected cases during the SARS outbreak period. Proteomic patterns associated with SARS were identified by bioinformatic and biostatistical analyses. Features of interest were then purified and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Twenty proteomic features were significantly different between the 2 groups. Fifteen were increased in the SARS group, and 5 were decreased. Their concentrations were correlated with 2 or more clinical and/or biochemical variables. Two were correlated with the SARS-CoV viral load. Hierarchical clustering analysis showed that a majority of the SARS patients (95%) had similar serum proteomic profiles and identified 2 subgroups with poor prognosis. ROC curve analysis identified individual features as potential biomarkers for SARS diagnosis (areas under ROC curves, 0.733-0.995). ROC curve areas were largest for an N-terminal fragment of complement C3c α chain (m/z 28 119) and an internal fragment of fibrinogen α-E chain (m/z 5908). Immunoglobulin κ light chain (m/z 24 505) positively correlated with viral load. Conclusions: Specific proteomic fingerprints in the sera of adult SARS patients could be used to identify SARS cases early during onset with high specificity and sensitivity. © 2006 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Association for Clinical Chemistry, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.clinchem.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Overen_US
dc.subject.meshBiological Markers - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshCluster Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshProtein Array Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshProteome - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshRoc Curveen_US
dc.subject.meshSars Virusen_US
dc.subject.meshSerumen_US
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - Blood - Diagnosis - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSpectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization - Methodsen_US
dc.titleSerum proteomic fingerprints of adult patients with severe acute respiratory syndromeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPang, RTK: rtkpang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPang, RTK=rp01761en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1373/clinchem.2005.061689en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16423906-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33644525295en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33644525295&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume52en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage421en_US
dc.identifier.epage429en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000235674900011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPang, RTK=7004376636en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoon, TCW=7006151710en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KCA=13403797200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, NLS=7402722286en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChiu, RWK=7103038413en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTong, YK=7202614141en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, RMY=12752064500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChim, SSC=6701728226en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNgai, SM=7006074219en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSung, JJY=35405352400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, YMD=7401935391en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats