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Article: Gated communities

TitleGated communities
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.geography-compass.com/
Citation
Geography Compass, 2008, v. 2 n. 4, p. 1189-1241 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article examines the notion of gated communities and, more generally, privately governed urban neighbourhoods. We do this by reviewing the idea that they are an innovative built-environment genre that has spread globally from a diverse set of roots and influences. These include the mass growth of private urban government in the USA over the past 30 years; rising income inequalities and fear in big cities; the French condominium law of 1804; and many other locally and culturally specific features of urban history. We contrast the popular notion that gated communities are simply an American export with the idea that they have emerged in various forms for different reasons in different places. We contrast supply-side and demand-side explanations, focusing on the idea that much of their appeal comes from the club-economy dynamics that underpin them. We examine the social and systemic costs – territorial outcomes – of cities made up of residential clubs, considering, in particular, the issue of segregation. We conclude with a reflection on the importance of local variations in the conditions that foster or inhibit the growth of a gated community market in particular countries.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/184049
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.229

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeGoix, RLen_US
dc.contributor.authorWebster, CJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-20T08:27:36Z-
dc.date.available2013-06-20T08:27:36Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationGeography Compass, 2008, v. 2 n. 4, p. 1189-1241en_US
dc.identifier.issn1749-8198en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/184049-
dc.description.abstractThis article examines the notion of gated communities and, more generally, privately governed urban neighbourhoods. We do this by reviewing the idea that they are an innovative built-environment genre that has spread globally from a diverse set of roots and influences. These include the mass growth of private urban government in the USA over the past 30 years; rising income inequalities and fear in big cities; the French condominium law of 1804; and many other locally and culturally specific features of urban history. We contrast the popular notion that gated communities are simply an American export with the idea that they have emerged in various forms for different reasons in different places. We contrast supply-side and demand-side explanations, focusing on the idea that much of their appeal comes from the club-economy dynamics that underpin them. We examine the social and systemic costs – territorial outcomes – of cities made up of residential clubs, considering, in particular, the issue of segregation. We conclude with a reflection on the importance of local variations in the conditions that foster or inhibit the growth of a gated community market in particular countries.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.geography-compass.com/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofGeography Compassen_US
dc.titleGated communitiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWebster, CJ: cwebster@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWebster, CJ=rp01747en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1749-8198.2008.00118.x-
dc.identifier.volume2en_US
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage1189en_US
dc.identifier.epage1241en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US

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