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Article: Social groups and housing differentiation in China's urban villages: An institutional interpretation

TitleSocial groups and housing differentiation in China's urban villages: An institutional interpretation
Authors
KeywordsChina
Housing Differentiation
Institution
Social Groups
Urban Villages
Issue Date2010
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02673037.asp
Citation
Housing Studies, 2010, v. 25 n. 5, p. 671-691 How to Cite?
AbstractPossessing different land rights and distinct landscapes, and separated from the rest of the city by invisible institutional boundaries, China's urban villages are unusual enclaves for landless farmers, rural migrants and other urban hukou (citizenship rights) holders in a period of rapid urbanization. Although urban villages are well known for their disorder and unruliness, they provide temporary livelihood for indigenous villagers and inexpensive shelter for migrants and other urban residents. Urban villages are typically perceived as homogeneous low-income neighbour- hoods characterized by low quality and high density housing. In fact, housing differentiation has emerged in urban villages among residents who possess different quantities and types of capital, rights/entitlements, skills and other assets. This paper aims to understand the social groups and the housing differentiation among them in the Chinese urban villages from an institutional perspective. It is based on a large-scale household survey in 11 urban villages in six Chinese cities. Empirical data show evidence of significant housing differentiation within these enclaves: indigenous villagers have become a petty rentier class; rural migrants pay the highest rents while enduring the lowest housing conditions; and housing conditions for urban hukou holders lie between those of the other two groups. Regression analysis suggests that urban villages share similar dynamics of housing differentiation as wider urban spaces, i.e. the combination of strong institutional constraints and emerging market influences leads to housing differentiation and inequality. Residents in urban villages are also highly mobile. The inflows and outflows of population form an important part of the urban socio-spatial restructuring process. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183462
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.309
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.101
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHe, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorWebster, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-27T08:38:13Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-27T08:38:13Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationHousing Studies, 2010, v. 25 n. 5, p. 671-691en_US
dc.identifier.issn0267-3037en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183462-
dc.description.abstractPossessing different land rights and distinct landscapes, and separated from the rest of the city by invisible institutional boundaries, China's urban villages are unusual enclaves for landless farmers, rural migrants and other urban hukou (citizenship rights) holders in a period of rapid urbanization. Although urban villages are well known for their disorder and unruliness, they provide temporary livelihood for indigenous villagers and inexpensive shelter for migrants and other urban residents. Urban villages are typically perceived as homogeneous low-income neighbour- hoods characterized by low quality and high density housing. In fact, housing differentiation has emerged in urban villages among residents who possess different quantities and types of capital, rights/entitlements, skills and other assets. This paper aims to understand the social groups and the housing differentiation among them in the Chinese urban villages from an institutional perspective. It is based on a large-scale household survey in 11 urban villages in six Chinese cities. Empirical data show evidence of significant housing differentiation within these enclaves: indigenous villagers have become a petty rentier class; rural migrants pay the highest rents while enduring the lowest housing conditions; and housing conditions for urban hukou holders lie between those of the other two groups. Regression analysis suggests that urban villages share similar dynamics of housing differentiation as wider urban spaces, i.e. the combination of strong institutional constraints and emerging market influences leads to housing differentiation and inequality. Residents in urban villages are also highly mobile. The inflows and outflows of population form an important part of the urban socio-spatial restructuring process. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02673037.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofHousing Studiesen_US
dc.subjectChinaen_US
dc.subjectHousing Differentiationen_US
dc.subjectInstitutionen_US
dc.subjectSocial Groupsen_US
dc.subjectUrban Villagesen_US
dc.titleSocial groups and housing differentiation in China's urban villages: An institutional interpretationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWebster, C: cwebster@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWebster, C=rp01747en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02673037.2010.483585en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77954964337en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77954964337&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume25en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage671en_US
dc.identifier.epage691en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000280385700005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHe, S=8621446800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, Y=8388500700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, F=7403463877en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWebster, C=7201838784en_US

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