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Article: Urban villages under China's rapid urbanization: Unregulated assets and transitional neighbourhoods

TitleUrban villages under China's rapid urbanization: Unregulated assets and transitional neighbourhoods
Authors
KeywordsChina
Transitional Neighbourhood
Urban Village
Urbanization
Issue Date2010
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/habitatint
Citation
Habitat International, 2010, v. 34 n. 2, p. 135-144 How to Cite?
AbstractChina's rapid urbanization, characterized by large-scale rural-urban migration and radial expansion of urban built-up areas, produces a new type of urban neighbourhood, namely the "urban village" (chengzhongcun). This paper considers the urban village as a community of interest for urbanized villagers, a migrant settlement with low-rent housing, and an urban self-organized grassroots unit, respectively related to the ambiguous property rights, an informal rental market, and the vacuum of state regulation. The urban village is therefore viewed as an unregulated asset despite its unruliness and disorder. Meanwhile, the formation and dynamics of the urban village are understood from the perspectives of land use transformation and property rights redistribution, with an additional emphasis on the succession of traditional social norms and networks. In this sense, the urban village can be seen as a transitional neighbourhood, characterized by unstable land rights and a mixture of rural and urban society. Drawing from the empirical data of 11 urban villages from six large Chinese cities, this paper presents the general characteristics of urban villages. This study points out that the vacuum of state regulation in the urban village makes possible a means of subsistence for landless villagers and provides low-cost residential space for migrants. The transformation of the urban village under state regulation would produce complicated results. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183457
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.029
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.038
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorHe, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorWebster, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-27T08:38:11Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-27T08:38:11Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationHabitat International, 2010, v. 34 n. 2, p. 135-144en_US
dc.identifier.issn0197-3975en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183457-
dc.description.abstractChina's rapid urbanization, characterized by large-scale rural-urban migration and radial expansion of urban built-up areas, produces a new type of urban neighbourhood, namely the "urban village" (chengzhongcun). This paper considers the urban village as a community of interest for urbanized villagers, a migrant settlement with low-rent housing, and an urban self-organized grassroots unit, respectively related to the ambiguous property rights, an informal rental market, and the vacuum of state regulation. The urban village is therefore viewed as an unregulated asset despite its unruliness and disorder. Meanwhile, the formation and dynamics of the urban village are understood from the perspectives of land use transformation and property rights redistribution, with an additional emphasis on the succession of traditional social norms and networks. In this sense, the urban village can be seen as a transitional neighbourhood, characterized by unstable land rights and a mixture of rural and urban society. Drawing from the empirical data of 11 urban villages from six large Chinese cities, this paper presents the general characteristics of urban villages. This study points out that the vacuum of state regulation in the urban village makes possible a means of subsistence for landless villagers and provides low-cost residential space for migrants. The transformation of the urban village under state regulation would produce complicated results. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/habitatinten_US
dc.relation.ispartofHabitat Internationalen_US
dc.subjectChinaen_US
dc.subjectTransitional Neighbourhooden_US
dc.subjectUrban Villageen_US
dc.subjectUrbanizationen_US
dc.titleUrban villages under China's rapid urbanization: Unregulated assets and transitional neighbourhoodsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWebster, C: cwebster@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWebster, C=rp01747en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.habitatint.2009.08.003en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-73149120255en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-73149120255&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume34en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage135en_US
dc.identifier.epage144en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000275011000001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, Y=8388500700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHe, S=8621446800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, F=7403463877en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWebster, C=7201838784en_US

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