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Article: Sustainability and public choice: a theoretical essay on urban performance indicators

TitleSustainability and public choice: a theoretical essay on urban performance indicators
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherPion Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.envplan.com/B.html
Citation
Environment And Planning B: Planning And Design, 1998, v. 25 n. 5, p. 709-729 How to Cite?
AbstractLiveable, endurable, and governable cities are sustained by a delicate balance of laws and policies that protect the interests of individuals, households, and firms at the same time as meeting the collective consumption needs of existing and future citizens. A general equilibrium model is developed in order to articulate some of the important theoretical features of this problem of urban management. Central to the model is the idea that sustainable policies and actions have themselves to be sustainable and that this is possible only if they reflect the preferences of citizens. Starting from a household utility-maximisation problem the model yields an equilibrium urban public goods matrix, designated the urban management matrix 8G, which may be viewed as a socially efficient urban management objective function. It contains quantities of environmental goods, social infrastructure, and regulative services that are socially optimal in the sense that any deviation from them will make some citizens worse off. These are used to derive a set of urban system performance indicators that represent a realistic specification of a sustainable city from the current perspective of citizens. The degree of environmental sustainability implicit in the indicators depends on the preferences of existing citizens for prudent collective action. The indicators represent the optimal prescription of sustainable-city policies for present application. If pro-sustainability education and propaganda are successful in changing preferences over time, then a comparative static use of the model charts a socially and politically sustainable path towards longer term environmental sustainability. The essay is a theoretical one intended to explore the nature of collective and individual consumption trade-offs in a sustainable city.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183431
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.195
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.582
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWebster, CJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-27T08:38:05Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-27T08:38:05Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.citationEnvironment And Planning B: Planning And Design, 1998, v. 25 n. 5, p. 709-729en_US
dc.identifier.issn0265-8135en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183431-
dc.description.abstractLiveable, endurable, and governable cities are sustained by a delicate balance of laws and policies that protect the interests of individuals, households, and firms at the same time as meeting the collective consumption needs of existing and future citizens. A general equilibrium model is developed in order to articulate some of the important theoretical features of this problem of urban management. Central to the model is the idea that sustainable policies and actions have themselves to be sustainable and that this is possible only if they reflect the preferences of citizens. Starting from a household utility-maximisation problem the model yields an equilibrium urban public goods matrix, designated the urban management matrix 8G, which may be viewed as a socially efficient urban management objective function. It contains quantities of environmental goods, social infrastructure, and regulative services that are socially optimal in the sense that any deviation from them will make some citizens worse off. These are used to derive a set of urban system performance indicators that represent a realistic specification of a sustainable city from the current perspective of citizens. The degree of environmental sustainability implicit in the indicators depends on the preferences of existing citizens for prudent collective action. The indicators represent the optimal prescription of sustainable-city policies for present application. If pro-sustainability education and propaganda are successful in changing preferences over time, then a comparative static use of the model charts a socially and politically sustainable path towards longer term environmental sustainability. The essay is a theoretical one intended to explore the nature of collective and individual consumption trade-offs in a sustainable city.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPion Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.envplan.com/B.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironment and Planning B: Planning and Designen_US
dc.titleSustainability and public choice: a theoretical essay on urban performance indicatorsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWebster, CJ: cwebster@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWebster, CJ=rp01747en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1068/b250709-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031753274en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031753274&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume25en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage709en_US
dc.identifier.epage729en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000076005500007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWebster, CJ=7201838784en_US

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