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Article: GIS and the scientific inputs to urban planning. Part 1: description

TitleGIS and the scientific inputs to urban planning. Part 1: description
Authors
Issue Date1993
Citation
Environment & Planning B: Planning & Design, 1993, v. 20 n. 6, p. 709-728 How to Cite?
AbstractUrban planning is one of many fields in which the advantages of GIS seem to be broadly accepted in general but not always in the particular. This paper is the first of a two-part review defining the scope of the contribution of GIS in planning analysis. The usefulness of GIS as a tool for building planning support systems, it is argued, is best assessed with reference to the nature of the scientific input required at the various stages of decisionmaking. Characterising planning by its scientific inputs, defined in terms of procedural and substantive planning theory, the author attempts to make definitive statements about the potential contribution of GIS irrespective of specific current technologies or the existence of tried applications. The technology's limitations as a planning aid are also highlighted, and tasks for which GIS offers little or no substantial advantages are identified. -from Author
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183423
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWebster, CJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-27T08:38:03Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-27T08:38:03Z-
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.citationEnvironment & Planning B: Planning & Design, 1993, v. 20 n. 6, p. 709-728en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183423-
dc.description.abstractUrban planning is one of many fields in which the advantages of GIS seem to be broadly accepted in general but not always in the particular. This paper is the first of a two-part review defining the scope of the contribution of GIS in planning analysis. The usefulness of GIS as a tool for building planning support systems, it is argued, is best assessed with reference to the nature of the scientific input required at the various stages of decisionmaking. Characterising planning by its scientific inputs, defined in terms of procedural and substantive planning theory, the author attempts to make definitive statements about the potential contribution of GIS irrespective of specific current technologies or the existence of tried applications. The technology's limitations as a planning aid are also highlighted, and tasks for which GIS offers little or no substantial advantages are identified. -from Authoren_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironment & Planning B: Planning & Designen_US
dc.titleGIS and the scientific inputs to urban planning. Part 1: descriptionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWebster, CJ: cwebster@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWebster, CJ=rp01747en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1068/b200709-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0027718540en_US
dc.identifier.volume20en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage709en_US
dc.identifier.epage728en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1993MT17600006-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWebster, CJ=7201838784en_US

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