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Article: Look Who's Talking: An Analysis of "Chair-Talk" in Business Meetings

TitleLook Who's Talking: An Analysis of "Chair-Talk" in Business Meetings
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=48
Citation
Journal Of Business And Technical Communication, 1998, v. 12 n. 2, p. 157-197 How to Cite?
AbstractManagement is a symbolic activity that depends to a great extent on a manager's control of language resources. However, relatively little is known about the linguistic and pragmatic features of managers' spoken discourse in a range of speech events common in organisations (e.g., meetings, negotiations, presentations, and so on). Drawing on a corpus of authentic business meetings videotaped at a large airline in Hong Kong, this article investigates a number of aspects of the managerial discourse that occurs in business meetings (chair-talk). Three specific aspects of "chair-talk" are considered: the proportion of chair-talk that occurs in business meetings, the patterns of speech acts that commonly occur in chair-talk, and the ways in which chairs convey command-oriented directive speech acts. These findings are then discussed within the context of such issues as hierarchical power structure in organisations, the function of different meeting types, the role of directness and indirectness in personal relationships, and linguistic tolerance in intercultural encounters.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183412
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.594
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.611
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBilbow, GTen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-27T07:13:08Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-27T07:13:08Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Business And Technical Communication, 1998, v. 12 n. 2, p. 157-197en_US
dc.identifier.issn1050-6519en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183412-
dc.description.abstractManagement is a symbolic activity that depends to a great extent on a manager's control of language resources. However, relatively little is known about the linguistic and pragmatic features of managers' spoken discourse in a range of speech events common in organisations (e.g., meetings, negotiations, presentations, and so on). Drawing on a corpus of authentic business meetings videotaped at a large airline in Hong Kong, this article investigates a number of aspects of the managerial discourse that occurs in business meetings (chair-talk). Three specific aspects of "chair-talk" are considered: the proportion of chair-talk that occurs in business meetings, the patterns of speech acts that commonly occur in chair-talk, and the ways in which chairs convey command-oriented directive speech acts. These findings are then discussed within the context of such issues as hierarchical power structure in organisations, the function of different meeting types, the role of directness and indirectness in personal relationships, and linguistic tolerance in intercultural encounters.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=48en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Business and Technical Communicationen_US
dc.titleLook Who's Talking: An Analysis of "Chair-Talk" in Business Meetingsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailBilbow, GT: gbilbow@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityBilbow, GT=rp01751en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032366018en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032366018&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume12en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage157en_US
dc.identifier.epage197en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBilbow, GT=6507966056en_US

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