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postgraduate thesis: Patterns of language use in a bilingual classroom at an international primary school in Hong Kong

TitlePatterns of language use in a bilingual classroom at an international primary school in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Shaw, J. F.. (2010). Patterns of language use in a bilingual classroom at an international primary school in Hong Kong. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5017705
AbstractThe main objective of this study was to investigate patterns of language use in a bilingual dual-taught classroom, and the impact of bilingual dual teaching on language development and language choice in young children (ages 7-8). The study was conducted in an immersion English/Putonghua classroom at an international primary school that adopts the International Baccalaureate Primary Years Program. English and Putonghua are the mediums of instruction although most students in the school come from Cantonese speaking Hong Kong-native families. The school is unique in this way because most students are learning two second languages simultaneously, in a classroom where there are two language (English and Putonghua) teachers, and both languages can be used at the same time. The study takes a qualitative approach with methods of data collection including a filmed observation of a bilingual lesson, a discourse analysis of the lesson transcription, and semi-structured post-lesson interviews with four members of the class. Results from the study found that English emerged as the dominating language. Transcript analysis also revealed that code-mixing and code-switching emerged as consistent patterns with purposeful functions. Furthermore, it was found that students tended to respond to speakers in the language that was used to initiate the talk, and that even during bilingual lessons, students tended to speak in English when nominated by their English teacher, and in Putonghua when nominated by their Chinese teacher. All students agreed that their language proficiency in English had improved due to more practice at school and regular use in the home.
DegreeMaster of Education
SubjectEducation, Bilingual - China - Hong Kong.
Language and languages - Study and teaching (Primary) - China - HongKong.
Dept/ProgramEducation
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183343

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorShaw, Jennifer Feng.-
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-26T06:54:29Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-26T06:54:29Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationShaw, J. F.. (2010). Patterns of language use in a bilingual classroom at an international primary school in Hong Kong. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5017705-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183343-
dc.description.abstractThe main objective of this study was to investigate patterns of language use in a bilingual dual-taught classroom, and the impact of bilingual dual teaching on language development and language choice in young children (ages 7-8). The study was conducted in an immersion English/Putonghua classroom at an international primary school that adopts the International Baccalaureate Primary Years Program. English and Putonghua are the mediums of instruction although most students in the school come from Cantonese speaking Hong Kong-native families. The school is unique in this way because most students are learning two second languages simultaneously, in a classroom where there are two language (English and Putonghua) teachers, and both languages can be used at the same time. The study takes a qualitative approach with methods of data collection including a filmed observation of a bilingual lesson, a discourse analysis of the lesson transcription, and semi-structured post-lesson interviews with four members of the class. Results from the study found that English emerged as the dominating language. Transcript analysis also revealed that code-mixing and code-switching emerged as consistent patterns with purposeful functions. Furthermore, it was found that students tended to respond to speakers in the language that was used to initiate the talk, and that even during bilingual lessons, students tended to speak in English when nominated by their English teacher, and in Putonghua when nominated by their Chinese teacher. All students agreed that their language proficiency in English had improved due to more practice at school and regular use in the home.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B50177059-
dc.subject.lcshEducation, Bilingual - China - Hong Kong.-
dc.subject.lcshLanguage and languages - Study and teaching (Primary) - China - HongKong.-
dc.titlePatterns of language use in a bilingual classroom at an international primary school in Hong Kong-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5017705-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Education-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineEducation-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5017705-
dc.date.hkucongregation2010-

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