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Conference Paper: The long-term and anti-aging effects of qigong on patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

TitleThe long-term and anti-aging effects of qigong on patients with chronic fatigue syndrome
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Issue Date2012
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12160
Citation
The 33rd Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM 2012), New Orleans, LA., 11-14 April 2012. In Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 2012, v. 43 n. 1 suppl., p. S283, abstract no. 4074 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: The beneficial effects of Qigong on chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) have been demonstrated in our previous randomized control trial (RCT). Apart from its benefits on increasing vigor and stress relief that may impact the endocrine and immunological systems; Qigong has long been considered as a means to achieve overall health and longevity. OBJECTIVES: The present RCT aims to study the long-term effects of Qigong on fatigue and health functioning, as well as telomerase activity, an anti-aging biomarker. METHODS: A RCT was conducted on 137 CFS patients with 72 patients in Qigong group and 65 in wait list control group. Ten 2-hour sessions (twice a week for 5 weeks) of Qigong exercise was delivered by a Qigong master. Fatigue and health functioning were measured using Chalder's fatigue scale and Short Form-12 in all participants while telomerase activity was analyzed in blood samples drawing from33 participants in Qigong group and 31 in control group. Independent T-test and pairwise T-test were used to analyze between groups and within group changes in all measures. RESULTS: From baseline (T0) to 3month post-intervention (T2), the change of fatigue was significantly greater in Qigong group than in control group (-16.1±10.8, and -6.8±8.2, p <0.001). Both groups did not differ significantly in the change of physical functioning (4.4 ±7.4 and 3.2±6.6, p=0.373); but Qigong group showed greater improvement than control group in mental functioning (8.2 ±11.7 and 1.2 ±9.5, p=0.001). The change of telomerase activity in Qigong group is marginally significant greater than control group (0.08±0.2 vs 0.02±0.06, p=0.099). Qigong group also had a significant increase in telomerase activity from T0 to T2 (from0.10 ±0.05 to 0.18±0.20, p=0.033), but this was not found in the control group (from 0.09 ±0.04 to 0.10±0.06, p=0.176). CONCLUSION: Qigong exercise helps reduce fatigue and improve mental health functioning in long term and also has anti-aging effect on CFS patients.
DescriptionConference Theme: Engaging New Partners and Perspectives
Paper Session 34: Complementary and Integrative Medicine Interventions (P34) - Scientific Session
This journal suppl. contain abstracts of the 2012 SBM Annual Meeting
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183243
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.195
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.112

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, RTHen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, JSMen_US
dc.contributor.authorYuen, LPen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, HYen_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, JSTen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-15T01:50:17Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-15T01:50:17Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 33rd Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM 2012), New Orleans, LA., 11-14 April 2012. In Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 2012, v. 43 n. 1 suppl., p. S283, abstract no. 4074en_US
dc.identifier.issn0883-6612-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183243-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Engaging New Partners and Perspectives-
dc.descriptionPaper Session 34: Complementary and Integrative Medicine Interventions (P34) - Scientific Session-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. contain abstracts of the 2012 SBM Annual Meeting-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The beneficial effects of Qigong on chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) have been demonstrated in our previous randomized control trial (RCT). Apart from its benefits on increasing vigor and stress relief that may impact the endocrine and immunological systems; Qigong has long been considered as a means to achieve overall health and longevity. OBJECTIVES: The present RCT aims to study the long-term effects of Qigong on fatigue and health functioning, as well as telomerase activity, an anti-aging biomarker. METHODS: A RCT was conducted on 137 CFS patients with 72 patients in Qigong group and 65 in wait list control group. Ten 2-hour sessions (twice a week for 5 weeks) of Qigong exercise was delivered by a Qigong master. Fatigue and health functioning were measured using Chalder's fatigue scale and Short Form-12 in all participants while telomerase activity was analyzed in blood samples drawing from33 participants in Qigong group and 31 in control group. Independent T-test and pairwise T-test were used to analyze between groups and within group changes in all measures. RESULTS: From baseline (T0) to 3month post-intervention (T2), the change of fatigue was significantly greater in Qigong group than in control group (-16.1±10.8, and -6.8±8.2, p <0.001). Both groups did not differ significantly in the change of physical functioning (4.4 ±7.4 and 3.2±6.6, p=0.373); but Qigong group showed greater improvement than control group in mental functioning (8.2 ±11.7 and 1.2 ±9.5, p=0.001). The change of telomerase activity in Qigong group is marginally significant greater than control group (0.08±0.2 vs 0.02±0.06, p=0.099). Qigong group also had a significant increase in telomerase activity from T0 to T2 (from0.10 ±0.05 to 0.18±0.20, p=0.033), but this was not found in the control group (from 0.09 ±0.04 to 0.10±0.06, p=0.176). CONCLUSION: Qigong exercise helps reduce fatigue and improve mental health functioning in long term and also has anti-aging effect on CFS patients.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12160-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Behavioral Medicineen_US
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.titleThe long-term and anti-aging effects of qigong on patients with chronic fatigue syndromeen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, RTH: tinho@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, JSM: chansm5@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, HY: chanhangyee@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, JST: jstsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHo, RTH=rp00497en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CLW=rp00579en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros211237en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros214081-
dc.identifier.hkuros214082-
dc.identifier.volume43-
dc.identifier.issue1 suppl.-
dc.identifier.spageS283-
dc.identifier.epageS283-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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