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Conference Paper: Preventing root caries development under oral biofilm challenge

TitlePreventing root caries development under oral biofilm challenge
Authors
KeywordsAntimicrobials
Biofilm
Caries
Collagen and Demineralization
Issue Date2013
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925
Citation
The 91st General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), Seattle, Washington, USA, 20-23 March 2013. In Journal of Dental Research, 2013, v. 92 n. Special Issue A: abstract no. 3277 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To study the preventive effects of chlorhexidine against root caries under oral biofilm in an artificial mouth. Methods: Sixteen human tooth-root disks were inoculated with a salivary sample that was produced by mixing the unstimulated saliva of three adults who had no untreated caries. The disks were incubated in an artificial mouth fed with a 5% sucrose solution three times daily for one week. Eight disks received a twice daily rinse of 0.12% chlorhexidine (test group). The other eight disks were rinsed in distilled water (control). The biofilm was then studied with three techniques: colony forming unit (CFU) counting, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The changes in the chemical structure of the root surface were studied using Fourier transform infra-Red spectroscopy. Type-I collagen and proteoglycans on the root surface were quantified using immunocytochemical staining. Results: The log CFU for the test and control groups were 4.21 and 8.27, respectively (p<0.001). The CFU count of Streptococci and Lactobacilli were negligible. Both the SEM and the CLSM showed suppressed bacteria growth in the test group. The log [amide-I: HPO42-] of the test and control groups were 1.11 and 1.93, respectively (p=0.02). The mean counts of sound type-I collagen in the test and control groups were 16.8/μm2 and 13.0/μm2, respectively (p<0.001), whereas the mean counts of intact proteoglycans were 5.6/μm2 and 3.5/μm2, respectively (P<0.001). Conclusions: Chlorhexidine suppressed the growth of selected cariogenic bacteria in oral biofilm on the root surface and thus protected tooth-root from cariogenic challenge. This abstract is based on research that was funded entirely or partially by an outside source: This study was supported by the Research Grant Council (Hong Kong) General Research Fund (Grant No. HKU 765111M).
DescriptionPoster Presentation
Session 384: Cariogenic Biofilms Composition and Properties
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183218
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.602
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.714

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMei, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorChu, CHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLo, ECMen_US
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-15T01:48:18Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-15T01:48:18Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 91st General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), Seattle, Washington, USA, 20-23 March 2013. In Journal of Dental Research, 2013, v. 92 n. Special Issue A: abstract no. 3277en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-0345-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183218-
dc.descriptionPoster Presentation-
dc.descriptionSession 384: Cariogenic Biofilms Composition and Properties-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To study the preventive effects of chlorhexidine against root caries under oral biofilm in an artificial mouth. Methods: Sixteen human tooth-root disks were inoculated with a salivary sample that was produced by mixing the unstimulated saliva of three adults who had no untreated caries. The disks were incubated in an artificial mouth fed with a 5% sucrose solution three times daily for one week. Eight disks received a twice daily rinse of 0.12% chlorhexidine (test group). The other eight disks were rinsed in distilled water (control). The biofilm was then studied with three techniques: colony forming unit (CFU) counting, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The changes in the chemical structure of the root surface were studied using Fourier transform infra-Red spectroscopy. Type-I collagen and proteoglycans on the root surface were quantified using immunocytochemical staining. Results: The log CFU for the test and control groups were 4.21 and 8.27, respectively (p<0.001). The CFU count of Streptococci and Lactobacilli were negligible. Both the SEM and the CLSM showed suppressed bacteria growth in the test group. The log [amide-I: HPO42-] of the test and control groups were 1.11 and 1.93, respectively (p=0.02). The mean counts of sound type-I collagen in the test and control groups were 16.8/μm2 and 13.0/μm2, respectively (p<0.001), whereas the mean counts of intact proteoglycans were 5.6/μm2 and 3.5/μm2, respectively (P<0.001). Conclusions: Chlorhexidine suppressed the growth of selected cariogenic bacteria in oral biofilm on the root surface and thus protected tooth-root from cariogenic challenge. This abstract is based on research that was funded entirely or partially by an outside source: This study was supported by the Research Grant Council (Hong Kong) General Research Fund (Grant No. HKU 765111M).-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dental Researchen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Dental Research. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc.-
dc.subjectAntimicrobials-
dc.subjectBiofilm-
dc.subjectCaries-
dc.subjectCollagen and Demineralization-
dc.titlePreventing root caries development under oral biofilm challengeen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailMei, L: leimei@hkusua.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChu, CH: chchu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLo, ECM: hrdplcm@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP: lakshman@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMei, L=rp01840en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChu, CH=rp00022en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLo, ECM=rp00015en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros214397en_US
dc.identifier.volume92en_US
dc.identifier.issueSpecial Issue A: abstract no. 3277en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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