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Conference Paper: Infant Growth and Subsequent Dental Caries Experience at age 12

TitleInfant Growth and Subsequent Dental Caries Experience at age 12
Authors
KeywordsBehavioral science
Caries
Children
Epidemiology and Growth & development
Issue Date2013
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925
Citation
The 91st General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), Seattle, Washington, USA, 20-23 March 2013. In Journal of Dental Research, 2013, v. 92 n. Special Issue A: abstract no. 127 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To investigate the effect of variations of the first year growth on dental caries experience of permanent dentition at 12 years old in a sub-sample of a Chinese birth cohort. Methods: A random sub-sample of 738, 12-year-old students from the ‘Children of 1997’ birth cohort was recruited. Clinical assessment for dental caries was performed according to the WHO criteria. Dental caries was measured as the number of decayed, missing and filled surfaces (DMFS). The students were classified into five growth trajectories based on their weights from birth to 12 months. The association of growth trajectories with subsequent dental caries experience in permanent dentition until the child’s 12 years old was explored through multivariable negative binomial regression adjusted models Results: Four hundred and eighty-five students (65.7%) had growth trajectories. Students with both the slowest growth trajectory (smallest birth weight and slow weight gain) and the fastest growth trajectory (heavier birth weight and accelerated weight gain) had significant higher DMFS until 12 years of age than the ‘normal’ growth trajectory (average birth weights and average weight gain). Adjusted incident rate ratios of dental caries were 2.36 (95% CI 1.25 4.47) for the slowest growth trajectory and 2.04 (95% CI 1.08 3.87) for the fastest growth trajectory compared with the normal one. After additionally adjusted for birth weight z-score, incident rate ratios of dental caries were 2.79 (95% CI 1.39 5.61) for the slowest growth trajectory and 1.94 (95% CI 1.02 3.69) for the fastest growth trajectory compared with the normal one. Conclusions: Among this lifecourse sample (‘Children of 1997’), slow growth infants born with low birth weight and fast growth infants with high birth weight were more susceptible to dental caries of permanent teeth at 12 years of age.
DescriptionOral Presentation
Session 30: Family and Early Life Predictors of Oral Health
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183210
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.602
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.714

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMcGrath, CPJen_US
dc.contributor.authorPeng, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, HMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-15T01:48:16Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-15T01:48:16Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 91st General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), Seattle, Washington, USA, 20-23 March 2013. In Journal of Dental Research, 2013, v. 92 n. Special Issue A: abstract no. 127en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-0345-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183210-
dc.descriptionOral Presentation-
dc.descriptionSession 30: Family and Early Life Predictors of Oral Health-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To investigate the effect of variations of the first year growth on dental caries experience of permanent dentition at 12 years old in a sub-sample of a Chinese birth cohort. Methods: A random sub-sample of 738, 12-year-old students from the ‘Children of 1997’ birth cohort was recruited. Clinical assessment for dental caries was performed according to the WHO criteria. Dental caries was measured as the number of decayed, missing and filled surfaces (DMFS). The students were classified into five growth trajectories based on their weights from birth to 12 months. The association of growth trajectories with subsequent dental caries experience in permanent dentition until the child’s 12 years old was explored through multivariable negative binomial regression adjusted models Results: Four hundred and eighty-five students (65.7%) had growth trajectories. Students with both the slowest growth trajectory (smallest birth weight and slow weight gain) and the fastest growth trajectory (heavier birth weight and accelerated weight gain) had significant higher DMFS until 12 years of age than the ‘normal’ growth trajectory (average birth weights and average weight gain). Adjusted incident rate ratios of dental caries were 2.36 (95% CI 1.25 4.47) for the slowest growth trajectory and 2.04 (95% CI 1.08 3.87) for the fastest growth trajectory compared with the normal one. After additionally adjusted for birth weight z-score, incident rate ratios of dental caries were 2.79 (95% CI 1.39 5.61) for the slowest growth trajectory and 1.94 (95% CI 1.02 3.69) for the fastest growth trajectory compared with the normal one. Conclusions: Among this lifecourse sample (‘Children of 1997’), slow growth infants born with low birth weight and fast growth infants with high birth weight were more susceptible to dental caries of permanent teeth at 12 years of age.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dental Researchen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Dental Research. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc.-
dc.subjectBehavioral science-
dc.subjectCaries-
dc.subjectChildren-
dc.subjectEpidemiology and Growth & development-
dc.titleInfant Growth and Subsequent Dental Caries Experience at age 12en_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailMcGrath, CPJ: mcgrathc@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, HM: wonghmg@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcGrath, CPJ=rp00037en_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, HM=rp00042en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros214388en_US
dc.identifier.volume92en_US
dc.identifier.issueSpecial Issue A: abstract no. 127en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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