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Article: Benefits and Tensions of Shadow Education: Comparative Perspectives on the Roles and Impact of Private Supplementary Tutoring in the Lives of Hong Kong Students

TitleBenefits and Tensions of Shadow Education: Comparative Perspectives on the Roles and Impact of Private Supplementary Tutoring in the Lives of Hong Kong Students
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherUniversity of Malaysia. The Journal's web site is located at http://crice.um.edu.my/publications.html
Citation
Journal of International and Comparative Education, 2013, v. 2 n. 1, p. 18-30 How to Cite?
AbstractOver half of Hong Kongs secondary students receive private supplementary tutoring, and in the last grade of secondary schooling the proportion exceeds 70%. Such tutoring is widely called shadow education because it mimics the regular system − as the curriculum in the schools changes, so it changes in the shadow; and as the regular school system expands, so does the shadow. The scale of private tutoring has grown significantly in the last two decades, and has become a standard feature of the lives of many families. Some tutoring is provided one-to-one by professionals, semi-professionals or amateurs; other tutoring is provided in small groups; and yet other tutoring is provided in lecture formats. Such tutoring demands significant financial investment by households, and also consumes substantial amounts of students time. Some tutoring has benefits in helping slow learners to keep up with their peers and in stretching further the learning of high achievers. Parents may also prefer to pay other people to manage homework and related stresses. However, tutoring can also increase pressures on young people, and is not always effective. This paper presents Hong Kong data within a framework that compares local patterns with those in other parts of the world. It raises questions about the implications of patterns and about appropriate responses for families, educators and policy makers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183171
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBray, Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-15T01:46:27Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-15T01:46:27Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of International and Comparative Education, 2013, v. 2 n. 1, p. 18-30en_US
dc.identifier.issn2232-1802-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183171-
dc.description.abstractOver half of Hong Kongs secondary students receive private supplementary tutoring, and in the last grade of secondary schooling the proportion exceeds 70%. Such tutoring is widely called shadow education because it mimics the regular system − as the curriculum in the schools changes, so it changes in the shadow; and as the regular school system expands, so does the shadow. The scale of private tutoring has grown significantly in the last two decades, and has become a standard feature of the lives of many families. Some tutoring is provided one-to-one by professionals, semi-professionals or amateurs; other tutoring is provided in small groups; and yet other tutoring is provided in lecture formats. Such tutoring demands significant financial investment by households, and also consumes substantial amounts of students time. Some tutoring has benefits in helping slow learners to keep up with their peers and in stretching further the learning of high achievers. Parents may also prefer to pay other people to manage homework and related stresses. However, tutoring can also increase pressures on young people, and is not always effective. This paper presents Hong Kong data within a framework that compares local patterns with those in other parts of the world. It raises questions about the implications of patterns and about appropriate responses for families, educators and policy makers.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Malaysia. The Journal's web site is located at http://crice.um.edu.my/publications.html-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of International and Comparative Educationen_US
dc.titleBenefits and Tensions of Shadow Education: Comparative Perspectives on the Roles and Impact of Private Supplementary Tutoring in the Lives of Hong Kong Studentsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailBray, M: mbray@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityBray, TM=rp00888en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros214336en_US
dc.identifier.volume2en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage18en_US
dc.identifier.epage30en_US
dc.publisher.placeMalaysia-

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