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Article: Vulnerability and adaptation of Hong Kong to hazards under climatic change conditions

TitleVulnerability and adaptation of Hong Kong to hazards under climatic change conditions
Authors
KeywordsCoastal Resources
Floods
Hong Kong
Landslides
Sea Level Rise
Storm Surges
Typhoons
Issue Date1996
PublisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0049-6979
Citation
Water, Air, And Soil Pollution, 1996, v. 92 n. 1-2, p. 181-190 How to Cite?
AbstractGiven the evidence from past experience, the coastal city of Hong Kong would be vulnerable to a variety of hazards that could be exacerbated by climatic change, including potential increases in typhoons, landslides, floods (both storm surges and rainstorms), and droughts, as well as the threat of future sea level rise. The greatest death tolls in the past have been inflicted during typhoon-induced storm surges. During two unnamed typhoons, in 1906 and 1937, the death tolls were 10,000 and 11,000, respectively. In contrast, death tolls associated with landslides and other hazards were relatively small. Under a climatic change scenario of an increase in frequency and severity of typhoons and rainstorms, and rising sea level, the vulnerable areas of Hong Kong can be identified. The shift in development from hillslope areas to coastal land reclamations over the last 25 years is a matter of concern. Although the hillslopes are susceptible to landslides during rainstorms, virtually all landslides can be traced to some important anthropogenic causes and are preventable with appropriate measures. In the coming decades, the low-lying areas created through coastal land reclamations could be susceptible to flooding during storm surges and rainstorms and as the sea level rises. These areas are also where there is high density urban and industrial development, and the vulnerability is the greatest. High seawalls to protect the reclaimed areas from storm surge flooding and sea level rise may increase the risk of rainstorm flooding. To reduce vulnerability, a combination of better monitoring, planning, protection, maintenance, and warning is proposed for adaptation. Monitoring is needed not only to detect future sea level changes but also to identify areas with the greatest risk. © 1996 Kluwer Academic Publishers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/182401
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.551
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.632
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYim, WWSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-29T04:00:00Z-
dc.date.available2013-04-29T04:00:00Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.identifier.citationWater, Air, And Soil Pollution, 1996, v. 92 n. 1-2, p. 181-190en_US
dc.identifier.issn0049-6979en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/182401-
dc.description.abstractGiven the evidence from past experience, the coastal city of Hong Kong would be vulnerable to a variety of hazards that could be exacerbated by climatic change, including potential increases in typhoons, landslides, floods (both storm surges and rainstorms), and droughts, as well as the threat of future sea level rise. The greatest death tolls in the past have been inflicted during typhoon-induced storm surges. During two unnamed typhoons, in 1906 and 1937, the death tolls were 10,000 and 11,000, respectively. In contrast, death tolls associated with landslides and other hazards were relatively small. Under a climatic change scenario of an increase in frequency and severity of typhoons and rainstorms, and rising sea level, the vulnerable areas of Hong Kong can be identified. The shift in development from hillslope areas to coastal land reclamations over the last 25 years is a matter of concern. Although the hillslopes are susceptible to landslides during rainstorms, virtually all landslides can be traced to some important anthropogenic causes and are preventable with appropriate measures. In the coming decades, the low-lying areas created through coastal land reclamations could be susceptible to flooding during storm surges and rainstorms and as the sea level rises. These areas are also where there is high density urban and industrial development, and the vulnerability is the greatest. High seawalls to protect the reclaimed areas from storm surge flooding and sea level rise may increase the risk of rainstorm flooding. To reduce vulnerability, a combination of better monitoring, planning, protection, maintenance, and warning is proposed for adaptation. Monitoring is needed not only to detect future sea level changes but also to identify areas with the greatest risk. © 1996 Kluwer Academic Publishers.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0049-6979en_US
dc.relation.ispartofWater, Air, and Soil Pollutionen_US
dc.subjectCoastal Resourcesen_US
dc.subjectFloodsen_US
dc.subjectHong Kongen_US
dc.subjectLandslidesen_US
dc.subjectSea Level Riseen_US
dc.subjectStorm Surgesen_US
dc.subjectTyphoonsen_US
dc.titleVulnerability and adaptation of Hong Kong to hazards under climatic change conditionsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYim, WWS: wwsyim@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYim, WWS=rp01746en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029659126en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0029659126&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume92en_US
dc.identifier.issue1-2en_US
dc.identifier.spage181en_US
dc.identifier.epage190en_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYim, WWS=7007024728en_US

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