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Article: Evolutionary and molecular analysis of the emergent severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus

TitleEvolutionary and molecular analysis of the emergent severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus
Authors
KeywordsEvolution
Nucleoprotein Structure
Phlebovirus
Phylogenetic
Severe Fever With Thrombocytopenia Syndrome
Tick-Borne Disease
Issue Date2013
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/714736/description#description
Citation
Epidemics, 2013, v. 5 n. 1, p. 1-10 How to Cite?
AbstractIn 2009, a novel Bunyavirus, called severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) was identified in the vicinity of Huaiyangshan, China. Clinical symptoms of this zoonotic virus included severe fever, thrombocytopenia, and leukocytopenia, with a mortality rate of ~10%. By the end of 2011 the disease associated with this pathogen had been reported from eleven Chinese provinces and human-to-human transmission suspected. However, current understanding of the evolution and molecular epidemiology of SFTSV before and after its identification is limited. To address this we undertake phylogenetic, evolutionary and structural analyses of all available SFTSV genetic sequences, including a new SFTSV complete genome isolated from a patient from Henan in 2011. Our discovery of a mosaic L segment sequence, which is descended from two major circulating lineages of SFTSV in China, represents the first evidence that homologous recombination plays a role in SFTSV evolution. Selection analyses indicate that negative selection is predominant in SFTSV genes, yet differences in selective forces among genes are consistent between Phlebovirus species. Further analysis reveals structural conservation between SFTSV and Rift Valley fever virus in the residues of their nucleocapsids that are responsible for oligomerisation and RNA-binding, suggesting the viruses share similar modes of higher-order assembly. We reconstruct the epidemic history of SFTSV using molecular clock and coalescent-based methods, revealing that the extant SFTSV lineages originated 50-150 years ago, and that the viral population experienced a recent growth phase that concurs with and extends the earliest serological reports of SFTSV infection. Taken together, our combined structural and phylogenetic analyses shed light into the evolutionary behaviour of SFTSV in the context of other, better-known, pathogenic Phleboviruses. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/182378
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.578
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.268
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, TTYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorBowden, TAen_US
dc.contributor.authorCui, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhuang, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, YYen_US
dc.contributor.authorCao, WCen_US
dc.contributor.authorPybus, OGen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-23T08:21:15Z-
dc.date.available2013-04-23T08:21:15Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationEpidemics, 2013, v. 5 n. 1, p. 1-10en_US
dc.identifier.issn1755-4365en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/182378-
dc.description.abstractIn 2009, a novel Bunyavirus, called severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) was identified in the vicinity of Huaiyangshan, China. Clinical symptoms of this zoonotic virus included severe fever, thrombocytopenia, and leukocytopenia, with a mortality rate of ~10%. By the end of 2011 the disease associated with this pathogen had been reported from eleven Chinese provinces and human-to-human transmission suspected. However, current understanding of the evolution and molecular epidemiology of SFTSV before and after its identification is limited. To address this we undertake phylogenetic, evolutionary and structural analyses of all available SFTSV genetic sequences, including a new SFTSV complete genome isolated from a patient from Henan in 2011. Our discovery of a mosaic L segment sequence, which is descended from two major circulating lineages of SFTSV in China, represents the first evidence that homologous recombination plays a role in SFTSV evolution. Selection analyses indicate that negative selection is predominant in SFTSV genes, yet differences in selective forces among genes are consistent between Phlebovirus species. Further analysis reveals structural conservation between SFTSV and Rift Valley fever virus in the residues of their nucleocapsids that are responsible for oligomerisation and RNA-binding, suggesting the viruses share similar modes of higher-order assembly. We reconstruct the epidemic history of SFTSV using molecular clock and coalescent-based methods, revealing that the extant SFTSV lineages originated 50-150 years ago, and that the viral population experienced a recent growth phase that concurs with and extends the earliest serological reports of SFTSV infection. Taken together, our combined structural and phylogenetic analyses shed light into the evolutionary behaviour of SFTSV in the context of other, better-known, pathogenic Phleboviruses. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/714736/description#descriptionen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEpidemicsen_US
dc.subjectEvolutionen_US
dc.subjectNucleoprotein Structureen_US
dc.subjectPhlebovirusen_US
dc.subjectPhylogeneticen_US
dc.subjectSevere Fever With Thrombocytopenia Syndromeen_US
dc.subjectTick-Borne Diseaseen_US
dc.titleEvolutionary and molecular analysis of the emergent severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virusen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, TTY: ttylam@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TTY=rp01733en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.epidem.2012.09.002en_US
dc.identifier.pmid23438426-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84867434974en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84867434974&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume5en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage1en_US
dc.identifier.epage10en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000315356200001-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TTY=36775821700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, W=55388863500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBowden, TA=24340921000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCui, N=55388758200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhuang, L=53165410200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, K=7404200567en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, YY=55388982400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCao, WC=55388244900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPybus, OG=6701390795en_US

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