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Article: Phylogeography of the spring and fall waves of the H1N1/09 pandemic influenza virus in the United States

TitlePhylogeography of the spring and fall waves of the H1N1/09 pandemic influenza virus in the United States
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jvi.asm.org/
Citation
Journal Of Virology, 2011, v. 85 n. 2, p. 828-834 How to Cite?
AbstractSpatial variation in the epidemiological patterns of successive waves of pandemic influenza virus in humans has been documented throughout the 20th century but never understood at a molecular level. However, the unprecedented intensity of sampling and whole-genome sequencing of the H1N1/09 pandemic virus now makes such an approach possible. To determine whether the spring and fall waves of the H1N1/09 influenza pandemic were associated with different epidemiological patterns, we undertook a large-scale phylogeographic analysis of viruses sampled from three localities in the United States. Analysis of genomic and epidemiological data reveals distinct spatial heterogeneities associated with the first pandemic wave, March to July 2009, in Houston, TX, Milwaukee, WI, and New York State. In Houston, no specific H1N1/09 viral lineage dominated during the spring of 2009, a period when little epidemiological activity was observed in Texas. In contrast, major pandemic outbreaks occurred at this time in Milwaukee and New York State, each dominated by a different viral lineage and resulting from strong founder effects. During the second pandemic wave, beginning in August 2009, all three U.S. localities were dominated by a single viral lineage, that which had been dominant in New York during wave 1. Hence, during this second phase of the pandemic, extensive viral migration and mixing diffused the spatially defined population structure that had characterized wave 1, amplifying the one viral lineage that had dominated early on in one of the world's largest international travel centers. Copyright © 2011, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/182376
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.606
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.347
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNelson, MIen_US
dc.contributor.authorTan, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorGhedin, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorWentworth, DEen_US
dc.contributor.authorGeorge, KSen_US
dc.contributor.authorEdelman, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorBeck, ETen_US
dc.contributor.authorFan, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, TTYen_US
dc.contributor.authorKumar, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorSpiro, DJen_US
dc.contributor.authorSimonsen, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorViboud, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorHolmes, ECen_US
dc.contributor.authorHenrickson, KJen_US
dc.contributor.authorMusser, JMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-23T08:21:13Z-
dc.date.available2013-04-23T08:21:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Virology, 2011, v. 85 n. 2, p. 828-834en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-538Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/182376-
dc.description.abstractSpatial variation in the epidemiological patterns of successive waves of pandemic influenza virus in humans has been documented throughout the 20th century but never understood at a molecular level. However, the unprecedented intensity of sampling and whole-genome sequencing of the H1N1/09 pandemic virus now makes such an approach possible. To determine whether the spring and fall waves of the H1N1/09 influenza pandemic were associated with different epidemiological patterns, we undertook a large-scale phylogeographic analysis of viruses sampled from three localities in the United States. Analysis of genomic and epidemiological data reveals distinct spatial heterogeneities associated with the first pandemic wave, March to July 2009, in Houston, TX, Milwaukee, WI, and New York State. In Houston, no specific H1N1/09 viral lineage dominated during the spring of 2009, a period when little epidemiological activity was observed in Texas. In contrast, major pandemic outbreaks occurred at this time in Milwaukee and New York State, each dominated by a different viral lineage and resulting from strong founder effects. During the second pandemic wave, beginning in August 2009, all three U.S. localities were dominated by a single viral lineage, that which had been dominant in New York during wave 1. Hence, during this second phase of the pandemic, extensive viral migration and mixing diffused the spatially defined population structure that had characterized wave 1, amplifying the one viral lineage that had dominated early on in one of the world's largest international travel centers. Copyright © 2011, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jvi.asm.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCluster Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H1n1 Subtype - Classification - Genetics - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - Epidemiology - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMolecular Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshNew York - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPandemicsen_US
dc.subject.meshPhylogenyen_US
dc.subject.meshPhylogeographyen_US
dc.subject.meshRna, Viral - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshSeasonsen_US
dc.subject.meshSequence Analysis, Dnaen_US
dc.subject.meshTexas - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshWisconsin - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.titlePhylogeography of the spring and fall waves of the H1N1/09 pandemic influenza virus in the United Statesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, TTY: ttylam@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TTY=rp01733en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/JVI.01762-10en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21068250-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78650639134en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78650639134&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume85en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage828en_US
dc.identifier.epage834en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000285554300018-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNelson, MI=15758216500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTan, Y=35312605500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGhedin, E=6602723755en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWentworth, DE=7004800841en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGeorge, KS=36707571400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEdelman, L=24757692400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBeck, ET=8868724400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFan, J=8634187800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TTY=36775821700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKumar, S=9434680000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSpiro, DJ=8916407300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSimonsen, L=7005506864en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridViboud, C=6701923799en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHolmes, EC=35433598300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHenrickson, KJ=7004132672en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMusser, JM=7103224550en_US

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