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Article: Experience of Southern Chinese: New challenges in treating young female breast cancer patients at child-bearing age, a call for multi-disciplinary collaboration

TitleExperience of Southern Chinese: New challenges in treating young female breast cancer patients at child-bearing age, a call for multi-disciplinary collaboration
Authors
KeywordsBrca1/2
Breast Cancer
Chinese
Fertility Conservation
Genetic Counselling
Psycho-Oncology
Issue Date2012
PublisherAsian Pacific Organization for Cancer Prevention. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apocpcontrol.org/
Citation
Asian Pacific Journal Of Cancer Prevention, 2012, v. 13 n. 7, p. 3535-3537 How to Cite?
AbstractCompared with western populations, Southern Chinese, especially those residing in Hong Kong, are experiencing increasing breast cancer incidence and also a younger onset of breast cancer. Combating this problem and treating young women with breast cancer poses specific challenges and complicated considerations. With reference to the postponement in the age of marriage and reproduction in modern societies, the issue of fertility after breast cancer, especially for high-risk young patients, is one significant quality of life concern that cannot be underestimated as a secondary medical topic. While the issue has its significance and is confronting front-line breast cancer care teams of different disciplines, related research is mostly on Caucasians. In cultures where the traditional expectation on women for child-bearing is still prominent, young breast cancer patients may endure significant distress over fertility options after breast cancer. There is a lack of related data on Asian breast cancer survivors at child-bearing age, which calls for a pressing need to encourage qualitative groundwork, case reports, and cohort experiences in hope for providing insight and arouse research interest. In order to provide a long-term comprehensive multidisciplinary management service with encouragement to encompass prospects for a positive future among young breast cancer survivors, relevant disciplines need to collaborate and work efficaciously together both on clinical and research aspects of cancer-related fertility issues.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/182368
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 2.514
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.813
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwong, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorChu, ATWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-23T08:20:24Z-
dc.date.available2013-04-23T08:20:24Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationAsian Pacific Journal Of Cancer Prevention, 2012, v. 13 n. 7, p. 3535-3537en_US
dc.identifier.issn1513-7368en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/182368-
dc.description.abstractCompared with western populations, Southern Chinese, especially those residing in Hong Kong, are experiencing increasing breast cancer incidence and also a younger onset of breast cancer. Combating this problem and treating young women with breast cancer poses specific challenges and complicated considerations. With reference to the postponement in the age of marriage and reproduction in modern societies, the issue of fertility after breast cancer, especially for high-risk young patients, is one significant quality of life concern that cannot be underestimated as a secondary medical topic. While the issue has its significance and is confronting front-line breast cancer care teams of different disciplines, related research is mostly on Caucasians. In cultures where the traditional expectation on women for child-bearing is still prominent, young breast cancer patients may endure significant distress over fertility options after breast cancer. There is a lack of related data on Asian breast cancer survivors at child-bearing age, which calls for a pressing need to encourage qualitative groundwork, case reports, and cohort experiences in hope for providing insight and arouse research interest. In order to provide a long-term comprehensive multidisciplinary management service with encouragement to encompass prospects for a positive future among young breast cancer survivors, relevant disciplines need to collaborate and work efficaciously together both on clinical and research aspects of cancer-related fertility issues.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAsian Pacific Organization for Cancer Prevention. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apocpcontrol.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofAsian Pacific Journal of Cancer Preventionen_US
dc.subjectBrca1/2en_US
dc.subjectBreast Canceren_US
dc.subjectChineseen_US
dc.subjectFertility Conservationen_US
dc.subjectGenetic Counsellingen_US
dc.subjectPsycho-Oncologyen_US
dc.titleExperience of Southern Chinese: New challenges in treating young female breast cancer patients at child-bearing age, a call for multi-disciplinary collaborationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailKwong, A: avakwong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityKwong, A=rp01734en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.7314/APJCP.2012.13.7.3535en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22994790-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84873605096en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros215753-
dc.identifier.hkuros217105-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84873605096&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume13en_US
dc.identifier.issue7en_US
dc.identifier.spage3535en_US
dc.identifier.epage3537en_US
dc.publisher.placeKoreaen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwong, A=8913654300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChu, AT=55586435800en_US

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