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Article: Infection control in dermatology practice

TitleInfection control in dermatology practice
Authors
KeywordsAlcohol-Based Hand Rub
Hand Hygiene
Standard And Transmission Based Precautions
Issue Date2011
PublisherMedcom Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.medicine.org.hk/hksdv/journalarchive.htm
Citation
Hong Kong Journal Of Dermatology And Venereology, 2011, v. 19 n. 2, p. 65-71 How to Cite?
AbstractInfection control is an often neglected topic until the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2003, when eight healthcare workers succumbed as a result of community and nosocomial outbreaks. This alerted all healthcare workers to comply with infection control practices in both the in-patient and out-patient settings as failure to do so might be a matter of life and death. Standard and transmission-based precautions have been promoted in the hospitals since 1996 and have also been applied in the dermatology clinic in the recent years. Standard precautions should be applied in all patients with the potential to infect others through blood and body fluids and include hand hygiene, careful handling of sharps, and the appropriate use of personal protective equipments during exposure to blood, body fluids, secretions, excretions except sweat, and breached skin and mucous membranes. Transmission-based precautions are the additional measures against pathogens that are spread through contact, droplets, and air. Among all infection control measures, hand hygiene practice using waterless alcohol-based hand rub remains the cornerstone of infection control - a 3 log reduction of microbial load can be achieved after 15 seconds of hand rubbing. Since most of the common pathogens including community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and influenza virus can survive on the hands for a short period of time, frequent use of alcohol-based hand rub, especially before touching the mucous membranes, can prevent self-inoculation of these pathogens. On the other hand, application of directly observed hand hygiene among patients and regular cleaning of the clinic may help to reduce the risk of environmental contamination by pathogens like Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae which can survive on dry inanimate surfaces for 1-3 days, and papillomavirus which can survive for up to 7 days.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/182355
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.061
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.100
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheng, VCCen_US
dc.contributor.authorChing, RHCen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, JFWen_US
dc.contributor.authorTai, JWMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-23T08:20:02Z-
dc.date.available2013-04-23T08:20:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Journal Of Dermatology And Venereology, 2011, v. 19 n. 2, p. 65-71en_US
dc.identifier.issn1814-7453en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/182355-
dc.description.abstractInfection control is an often neglected topic until the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2003, when eight healthcare workers succumbed as a result of community and nosocomial outbreaks. This alerted all healthcare workers to comply with infection control practices in both the in-patient and out-patient settings as failure to do so might be a matter of life and death. Standard and transmission-based precautions have been promoted in the hospitals since 1996 and have also been applied in the dermatology clinic in the recent years. Standard precautions should be applied in all patients with the potential to infect others through blood and body fluids and include hand hygiene, careful handling of sharps, and the appropriate use of personal protective equipments during exposure to blood, body fluids, secretions, excretions except sweat, and breached skin and mucous membranes. Transmission-based precautions are the additional measures against pathogens that are spread through contact, droplets, and air. Among all infection control measures, hand hygiene practice using waterless alcohol-based hand rub remains the cornerstone of infection control - a 3 log reduction of microbial load can be achieved after 15 seconds of hand rubbing. Since most of the common pathogens including community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and influenza virus can survive on the hands for a short period of time, frequent use of alcohol-based hand rub, especially before touching the mucous membranes, can prevent self-inoculation of these pathogens. On the other hand, application of directly observed hand hygiene among patients and regular cleaning of the clinic may help to reduce the risk of environmental contamination by pathogens like Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae which can survive on dry inanimate surfaces for 1-3 days, and papillomavirus which can survive for up to 7 days.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMedcom Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.medicine.org.hk/hksdv/journalarchive.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Journal of Dermatology and Venereologyen_US
dc.subjectAlcohol-Based Hand Ruben_US
dc.subjectHand Hygieneen_US
dc.subjectStandard And Transmission Based Precautionsen_US
dc.titleInfection control in dermatology practiceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, JFW: jfwchan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, JFW=rp01736en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79960780852en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79960780852&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume19en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage65en_US
dc.identifier.epage71en_US
dc.publisher.placeHong Kongen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, VCC=38662328400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChing, RHC=46960949100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, JFW=24278817900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTai, JWM=7101993154en_US

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