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Article: MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging Detects Rapid Microstructural Changes in Amygdala and Hippocampus Following Fear Conditioning in Mice

TitleMR Diffusion Tensor Imaging Detects Rapid Microstructural Changes in Amygdala and Hippocampus Following Fear Conditioning in Mice
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
Plos One, 2013, v. 8 n. 1, article no. e51704 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Following fear conditioning (FC), ex vivo evidence suggests that early dynamics of cellular and molecular plasticity in amygdala and hippocampal circuits mediate responses to fear. Such altered dynamics in fear circuits are thought to be etiologically related to anxiety disorders including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Consistent with this, neuroimaging studies of individuals with established PTSD in the months after trauma have revealed changes in brain regions responsible for processing fear. However, whether early changes in fear circuits can be captured in vivo is not known. Methods: We hypothesized that in vivo magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) would be sensitive to rapid microstructural changes elicited by FC in an experimental mouse PTSD model. We employed a repeated measures paired design to compare in vivo DTI measurements before, one hour after, and one day after FC-exposed mice (n = 18). Results: Using voxel-wise repeated measures analysis, fractional anisotropy (FA) significantly increased then decreased in amygdala, decreased then increased in hippocampus, and was increasing in cingulum and adjacent gray matter one hour and one day post-FC respectively. These findings demonstrate that DTI is sensitive to early changes in brain microstructure following FC, and that FC elicits distinct, rapid in vivo responses in amygdala and hippocampus. Conclusions: Our results indicate that DTI can detect rapid microstructural changes in brain regions known to mediate fear conditioning in vivo. DTI indices could be explored as a translational tool to capture potential early biological changes in individuals at risk for developing PTSD. © 2013 Ding et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/182348
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDing, AYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Qen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhou, IYen_US
dc.contributor.authorMa, SJen_US
dc.contributor.authorTong, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcalonan, GMen_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, EXen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-23T08:19:32Z-
dc.date.available2013-04-23T08:19:32Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationPlos One, 2013, v. 8 n. 1, article no. e51704en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/182348-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Following fear conditioning (FC), ex vivo evidence suggests that early dynamics of cellular and molecular plasticity in amygdala and hippocampal circuits mediate responses to fear. Such altered dynamics in fear circuits are thought to be etiologically related to anxiety disorders including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Consistent with this, neuroimaging studies of individuals with established PTSD in the months after trauma have revealed changes in brain regions responsible for processing fear. However, whether early changes in fear circuits can be captured in vivo is not known. Methods: We hypothesized that in vivo magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) would be sensitive to rapid microstructural changes elicited by FC in an experimental mouse PTSD model. We employed a repeated measures paired design to compare in vivo DTI measurements before, one hour after, and one day after FC-exposed mice (n = 18). Results: Using voxel-wise repeated measures analysis, fractional anisotropy (FA) significantly increased then decreased in amygdala, decreased then increased in hippocampus, and was increasing in cingulum and adjacent gray matter one hour and one day post-FC respectively. These findings demonstrate that DTI is sensitive to early changes in brain microstructure following FC, and that FC elicits distinct, rapid in vivo responses in amygdala and hippocampus. Conclusions: Our results indicate that DTI can detect rapid microstructural changes in brain regions known to mediate fear conditioning in vivo. DTI indices could be explored as a translational tool to capture potential early biological changes in individuals at risk for developing PTSD. © 2013 Ding et al.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.actionen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONEen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleMR Diffusion Tensor Imaging Detects Rapid Microstructural Changes in Amygdala and Hippocampus Following Fear Conditioning in Miceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZhou, IY: izhou@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailMcAlonan, GM: mcalonan@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWu, EX: ewu1@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZhou, IY=rp01739en_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcAlonan, GM=rp00475en_US
dc.identifier.authorityWu, EX=rp00193en_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcAlonan, GM=rp00475-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0051704en_US
dc.identifier.pmid23382811-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3559642-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84873867425en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros217895-
dc.identifier.hkuros225437-
dc.identifier.hkuros240564-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84873867425&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume8en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000315563800006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDing, AY=35745892100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, Q=55597046000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhou, IY=35424838500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMa, SJ=55595458300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTong, G=55595389800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcAlonan, GM=6603123011en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, EX=7202128034en_US

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