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Article: Breast-conserving surgery in Hong Kong Chinese women

TitleBreast-conserving surgery in Hong Kong Chinese women
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00268/
Citation
World Journal Of Surgery, 2008, v. 32 n. 12, p. 2549-2553 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Since the introduction of breast-conserving surgery (BCS), it has been increasingly accepted as the standard surgical option for suitable breast cancer patients in Western countries. However, there have been reports suggesting striking ethnic variations in those undergoing BCS. This study aimed to review the rate of BCS in Hong Kong Chinese breast cancer patients and the possible clinicopathologic and psychosocial factors that may have affected the choice of surgery. Methods: Patients in a university academic surgical center with early-stage breast cancer (stage I/II invasive carcinoma and carcinoma in situ) who underwent definitive surgery from January 2001 to December 2005 were studied. BCS was considered feasible for those with (1) the optimal tumor size for which an acceptable cosmetic outcome can be achieved after surgery, (2) unifocal disease, and (3) no contraindication for postoperative radiotherapy. The proportion of women undergoing BCS or mastectomy were compared. Factors affecting the choice of surgery were correlated. Results: Six hundred eighty female patients with early-stage breast cancer underwent surgery during the study period; 495 (72.8%) mastectomies, 149 (21.9%) BCS, and 36 (5.3%) mastectomies with immediate reconstruction were performed. For those patients who had mastectomies, 54.8% (271/495) had considered BCS as the initial surgical option. Among these, 19.6% (53/271) failed to have BCS performed due to margin involvement or extensive disease, and 80.4% (218/271) declined BCS and opted for mastectomy only. Age, marital status, and educational level were found to be independent significant factors affecting the choice of BCS. Conclusion: The rate of BCS in Hong Kong is relatively low compared to that of Western countries. Patients who opted for mastectomies tended to be older, married, and have a lower educational level. Prospective studies on how sociocultural, clinicopathologic, and other factors important in treatment decision-making processes and psychosocial impact of choice of surgery are important so that an ethnic-specific assessment can be made. Suitability and acceptance of BCS by Chinese women should increase with better understanding and education. © 2008 Société Internationale de Chirurgie.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/182266
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.523
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.375
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSuen, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorChow, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorKwong, Aen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-19T07:37:46Z-
dc.date.available2013-04-19T07:37:46Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationWorld Journal Of Surgery, 2008, v. 32 n. 12, p. 2549-2553en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0364-2313en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/182266-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Since the introduction of breast-conserving surgery (BCS), it has been increasingly accepted as the standard surgical option for suitable breast cancer patients in Western countries. However, there have been reports suggesting striking ethnic variations in those undergoing BCS. This study aimed to review the rate of BCS in Hong Kong Chinese breast cancer patients and the possible clinicopathologic and psychosocial factors that may have affected the choice of surgery. Methods: Patients in a university academic surgical center with early-stage breast cancer (stage I/II invasive carcinoma and carcinoma in situ) who underwent definitive surgery from January 2001 to December 2005 were studied. BCS was considered feasible for those with (1) the optimal tumor size for which an acceptable cosmetic outcome can be achieved after surgery, (2) unifocal disease, and (3) no contraindication for postoperative radiotherapy. The proportion of women undergoing BCS or mastectomy were compared. Factors affecting the choice of surgery were correlated. Results: Six hundred eighty female patients with early-stage breast cancer underwent surgery during the study period; 495 (72.8%) mastectomies, 149 (21.9%) BCS, and 36 (5.3%) mastectomies with immediate reconstruction were performed. For those patients who had mastectomies, 54.8% (271/495) had considered BCS as the initial surgical option. Among these, 19.6% (53/271) failed to have BCS performed due to margin involvement or extensive disease, and 80.4% (218/271) declined BCS and opted for mastectomy only. Age, marital status, and educational level were found to be independent significant factors affecting the choice of BCS. Conclusion: The rate of BCS in Hong Kong is relatively low compared to that of Western countries. Patients who opted for mastectomies tended to be older, married, and have a lower educational level. Prospective studies on how sociocultural, clinicopathologic, and other factors important in treatment decision-making processes and psychosocial impact of choice of surgery are important so that an ethnic-specific assessment can be made. Suitability and acceptance of BCS by Chinese women should increase with better understanding and education. © 2008 Société Internationale de Chirurgie.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00268/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofWorld Journal of Surgeryen_HK
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology-
dc.subject.meshBreast Neoplasms - ethnology - psychology - surgery-
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma in Situ - ethnology - psychology - surgery-
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Ductal, Breast - ethnology - psychology - surgery-
dc.subject.meshMastectomy, Segmental-
dc.titleBreast-conserving surgery in Hong Kong Chinese womenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKwong, A: avakwong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKwong, A=rp01734en_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00268-008-9586-9en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18563485-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-56349135311en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros143642-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-56349135311&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume32en_HK
dc.identifier.issue12en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2549en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2553en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000260968500003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSuen, D=8876971300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChow, L=24365858800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwong, A=8913654300en_HK

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