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Conference Paper: Infant Growth And Subsequent Occurrence Of Developmental Defects Of Enamel

TitleInfant Growth And Subsequent Occurrence Of Developmental Defects Of Enamel
Authors
KeywordsChildren, Enamel
Epidemiology and Infants
Issue Date2012
PublisherSage Publications, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925
Citation
The Annual Meeting of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) Southeast Asian Division, Hong Kong, China, 3-4 November 2012. In Journal of Dental Research, 2012, v. 91 n. Special Issue C: abstract no. 168830 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To test the hypothesis that heavy birth weight and rapid infant growth during the first year of life are associated with lower developmental defects of enamel (DDE) in the permanent dentition. Methods: A random sample of 668, 12-year-old students was recruited from a birth cohort. Permanent incisors and first molars were clinically examined for DDE using the modified FDI (DDE) Index. Multivariable negative binomial regression was used to examine the association of growth trajectory (5 categories) from birth to 12 months with the occurrence of DDE (any defects, demarcated opacities, diffuse opacities, and hypoplasia) in the permanent dentition. Potential confounders included gender, gestational age, parental education, type of birth, hospitalization, and health status. Results: The response rate was 76.9% (n = 514). Four hundred and eighty-five children had complete records of growth and health related data. Infants who had birth weights closer to the WHO average and rapid growth were more likely to have “demarcated opacities” in their permanent incisors and first molars (p<0.05). Heavier birth weights and rapid growth were found to be associated with the occurrence of “demarcated opacities” and “hypoplasia” (p<0.05). Conclusions: Infants with heavy birth weight and rapid growth were more vulnerable to the occurrence of DDE in their permanent dentition. (The work described in this abstract was fully supported by a grant from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China [Project No. 782811].) This abstract is based on research that was funded entirely or partially by an outside source: the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China [Project No. 782811]
DescriptionSession: Behavioral, Epidemiologic and Health Services Research
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/182080
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.602
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.714

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, HMen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcGrath, CPJen_US
dc.contributor.authorPeng, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorPei, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorKing, NMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-17T07:20:48Z-
dc.date.available2013-04-17T07:20:48Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Annual Meeting of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) Southeast Asian Division, Hong Kong, China, 3-4 November 2012. In Journal of Dental Research, 2012, v. 91 n. Special Issue C: abstract no. 168830en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-0345-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/182080-
dc.descriptionSession: Behavioral, Epidemiologic and Health Services Research-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To test the hypothesis that heavy birth weight and rapid infant growth during the first year of life are associated with lower developmental defects of enamel (DDE) in the permanent dentition. Methods: A random sample of 668, 12-year-old students was recruited from a birth cohort. Permanent incisors and first molars were clinically examined for DDE using the modified FDI (DDE) Index. Multivariable negative binomial regression was used to examine the association of growth trajectory (5 categories) from birth to 12 months with the occurrence of DDE (any defects, demarcated opacities, diffuse opacities, and hypoplasia) in the permanent dentition. Potential confounders included gender, gestational age, parental education, type of birth, hospitalization, and health status. Results: The response rate was 76.9% (n = 514). Four hundred and eighty-five children had complete records of growth and health related data. Infants who had birth weights closer to the WHO average and rapid growth were more likely to have “demarcated opacities” in their permanent incisors and first molars (p<0.05). Heavier birth weights and rapid growth were found to be associated with the occurrence of “demarcated opacities” and “hypoplasia” (p<0.05). Conclusions: Infants with heavy birth weight and rapid growth were more vulnerable to the occurrence of DDE in their permanent dentition. (The work described in this abstract was fully supported by a grant from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China [Project No. 782811].) This abstract is based on research that was funded entirely or partially by an outside source: the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China [Project No. 782811]-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dental Researchen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Dental Research. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc..-
dc.subjectChildren, Enamel-
dc.subjectEpidemiology and Infants-
dc.titleInfant Growth And Subsequent Occurrence Of Developmental Defects Of Enamelen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, HM: wonghmg@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailMcGrath, CPJ: mcgrathc@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailKing, NM: hhdbknm@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, HM=rp00042en_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcGrath, CPJ=rp00037en_US
dc.identifier.authorityKing, NM=rp00006en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros213944en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros212373-
dc.identifier.volume91en_US
dc.identifier.issueSpecial Issue C: abstract no. 168830en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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