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Article: Predictors and Consequences of In-hospital Formula Supplementation for Healthy Breastfeeding Newborns

TitlePredictors and Consequences of In-hospital Formula Supplementation for Healthy Breastfeeding Newborns
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherSage Science Press (US). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=250
Citation
Journal of Human Lactation, 2013, v. 29 n. 4, p. 527-536 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Although exclusive breastfeeding is recommended for the first 6 months, the use of breast milk substitutes is widespread around the world. OBJECTIVES: To describe the patterns of infant formula supplementation among healthy breastfeeding newborns, to identify factors contributing to in-hospital formula supplementation, and to assess the dose-response relationship between the amount of in-hospital formula supplementation and the duration of any breastfeeding. METHODS: A sample of 1246 breastfeeding mother-infant pairs was recruited from 4 public hospitals in Hong Kong and followed prospectively for 12 months or until weaned. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine factors associated with in-hospital supplementation. Cox regression analysis was used to explore the impact of in-hospital supplementation on breastfeeding duration. RESULTS: Of the total, 82.5% of newborns were supplemented in the hospital; one-half received formula within 5 hours of birth. Assisted vaginal delivery (odds ratio [OR] = 2.06, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03, 4.15), cesarean section (OR = 3.45, 95% CI 1.75, 6.80), and higher birth weight (OR = 1.56, 95% CI 1.12, 2.18) were positively associated with in-hospital formula supplementation, whereas initiating breastfeeding in the delivery room (OR = 0.55, 95% CI 0.33, 0.89) was associated with decreased likelihood of in-hospital supplementation. Any infant formula in the first 48 hours was associated with a shorter duration of breastfeeding (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.51, 95% CI 1.27, 1.80), but there was no dose-response effect. CONCLUSION: In-hospital formula supplementation is common in Hong Kong hospitals and appears to be detrimental to breastfeeding duration. Continued efforts should be made to avoid the provision of infant formula to breastfeeding babies while in the hospital unless medically indicated.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/181752
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.233
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.896

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorParry, JEen_US
dc.contributor.authorIp, DKMen_US
dc.contributor.authorChau, PYKen_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, KMen_US
dc.contributor.authorTarrant, AMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-19T03:55:51Z-
dc.date.available2013-03-19T03:55:51Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Human Lactation, 2013, v. 29 n. 4, p. 527-536en_US
dc.identifier.issn0890-3344-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/181752-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Although exclusive breastfeeding is recommended for the first 6 months, the use of breast milk substitutes is widespread around the world. OBJECTIVES: To describe the patterns of infant formula supplementation among healthy breastfeeding newborns, to identify factors contributing to in-hospital formula supplementation, and to assess the dose-response relationship between the amount of in-hospital formula supplementation and the duration of any breastfeeding. METHODS: A sample of 1246 breastfeeding mother-infant pairs was recruited from 4 public hospitals in Hong Kong and followed prospectively for 12 months or until weaned. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine factors associated with in-hospital supplementation. Cox regression analysis was used to explore the impact of in-hospital supplementation on breastfeeding duration. RESULTS: Of the total, 82.5% of newborns were supplemented in the hospital; one-half received formula within 5 hours of birth. Assisted vaginal delivery (odds ratio [OR] = 2.06, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03, 4.15), cesarean section (OR = 3.45, 95% CI 1.75, 6.80), and higher birth weight (OR = 1.56, 95% CI 1.12, 2.18) were positively associated with in-hospital formula supplementation, whereas initiating breastfeeding in the delivery room (OR = 0.55, 95% CI 0.33, 0.89) was associated with decreased likelihood of in-hospital supplementation. Any infant formula in the first 48 hours was associated with a shorter duration of breastfeeding (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.51, 95% CI 1.27, 1.80), but there was no dose-response effect. CONCLUSION: In-hospital formula supplementation is common in Hong Kong hospitals and appears to be detrimental to breastfeeding duration. Continued efforts should be made to avoid the provision of infant formula to breastfeeding babies while in the hospital unless medically indicated.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Science Press (US). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=250-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Human Lactationen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Human Lactation. Copyright © Sage Science Press (US).-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titlePredictors and Consequences of In-hospital Formula Supplementation for Healthy Breastfeeding Newbornsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailIp, DKM: dkmip@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailTarrant, AM: tarrantm@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityIp, DKM=rp00256en_US
dc.identifier.authorityTarrant, AM=rp00461en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0890334412474719-
dc.identifier.pmid23439865-
dc.identifier.hkuros213657en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros235667-
dc.identifier.volume29-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage527-
dc.identifier.epage536-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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