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Article: Palaeomagnetic re-investigation of Early Permian rift basalts from the Baoshan Block, SW China: constraints on the site-of-origin of the Gondwana-derived eastern Cimmerian terranes

TitlePalaeomagnetic re-investigation of Early Permian rift basalts from the Baoshan Block, SW China: constraints on the site-of-origin of the Gondwana-derived eastern Cimmerian terranes
Authors
KeywordsAsia
Continental margins
Divergent
Palaeomagnetism applied to tectonics
Issue Date2013
PublisherOxford University Press, published in association with Royal Astronomical Society. The Journal's web site is located at https://academic.oup.com/gji/
Citation
Geophysical Journal International, 2013, v. 193 n. 2, p. 650-663 How to Cite?
AbstractA palaeomagnetic investigation was carried out on a series of rift basalts (Woniusi Formation) that accumulated on the Baoshan block (SW China) in the Early Permian, the aim being to provide quantitative palaeogeographical information on the eastern Cimmerian terrane as it detached from eastern Gondwana. Reliable data were obtained from four locations/28 individual cooling units, and when combined with the findings of an earlier study (three locations/19 sites) indicate that breakup occurred at 41.9°S (with errors, 34.2–51.2°S). Using this information, we fit Baoshan against Gondwana within a narrow longitudinal belt close to where northeast Greater India and northwest Australia were once in close proximity. Furthermore, we suggest that Sibumasu (Simao-Burma-Malyasia-Sumatra; the largest of the eastern Cimmerian blocks) lay directly to the east, offshore of Australia; Qiangtang and Lhasa almost certainly sat to the west (off northern Greater India–SE Arabia), but we are uncertain as to their exact configuration. Our findings are compared with several rather different models that have been published in recent years. The new palaeomagnetic constraint highlights the flexibility authors currently have in reconstructing the region, principally because of the overall lack of similar high-quality data from the various blocks. We explain how new data could resolve these ambiguities, thereby offering more robust explanations for eastern Gondwana's late Palaeozoic development.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/181664
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 2.528
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.839
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAli, JR-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, MC-
dc.contributor.authorAitchison, JC-
dc.contributor.authorSun, YD-
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-19T03:52:52Z-
dc.date.available2013-03-19T03:52:52Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationGeophysical Journal International, 2013, v. 193 n. 2, p. 650-663-
dc.identifier.issn0956-540X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/181664-
dc.description.abstractA palaeomagnetic investigation was carried out on a series of rift basalts (Woniusi Formation) that accumulated on the Baoshan block (SW China) in the Early Permian, the aim being to provide quantitative palaeogeographical information on the eastern Cimmerian terrane as it detached from eastern Gondwana. Reliable data were obtained from four locations/28 individual cooling units, and when combined with the findings of an earlier study (three locations/19 sites) indicate that breakup occurred at 41.9°S (with errors, 34.2–51.2°S). Using this information, we fit Baoshan against Gondwana within a narrow longitudinal belt close to where northeast Greater India and northwest Australia were once in close proximity. Furthermore, we suggest that Sibumasu (Simao-Burma-Malyasia-Sumatra; the largest of the eastern Cimmerian blocks) lay directly to the east, offshore of Australia; Qiangtang and Lhasa almost certainly sat to the west (off northern Greater India–SE Arabia), but we are uncertain as to their exact configuration. Our findings are compared with several rather different models that have been published in recent years. The new palaeomagnetic constraint highlights the flexibility authors currently have in reconstructing the region, principally because of the overall lack of similar high-quality data from the various blocks. We explain how new data could resolve these ambiguities, thereby offering more robust explanations for eastern Gondwana's late Palaeozoic development.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press, published in association with Royal Astronomical Society. The Journal's web site is located at https://academic.oup.com/gji/-
dc.relation.ispartofGeophysical Journal International-
dc.rightsThis article has been accepted for publication in Geophysical Journal International ©: 2013 The Authors. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.-
dc.subjectAsia-
dc.subjectContinental margins-
dc.subjectDivergent-
dc.subjectPalaeomagnetism applied to tectonics-
dc.titlePalaeomagnetic re-investigation of Early Permian rift basalts from the Baoshan Block, SW China: constraints on the site-of-origin of the Gondwana-derived eastern Cimmerian terranes-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailAli, JR: jrali@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityAli, JR=rp00659-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/gji/ggt012-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84876791330-
dc.identifier.hkuros213612-
dc.identifier.volume193-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage650-
dc.identifier.epage663-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000318108400009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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