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Article: Can engagement in academic dishonesty be described as planned behaviour or lack of self-control?

TitleCan engagement in academic dishonesty be described as planned behaviour or lack of self-control?
Authors
Issue Date2011
Citation
Pharmacy Education, 2011, v. 11 n.1, 2011 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground - Students’ engagement in dishonest behaviours is problematic and may influence future professional practice. Aims - To consider the antecedents predicting engagement in academic dishonesty. Methods - A total of 433 pharmacy and medical students participated in a survey measuring engagement in academic dishonesty, self deception, justification, and acceptability. Hierarchical linear regression and path analysis methods were conducted. Results – Engagement in academic dishonesty was predicted by later years of study, justification, responses to a case scenario and notions of acceptability (R2 = 34%). An appropriately fitted path model showed that each explanatory variable correlated with engagement in academic dishonesty separately rather than being mediated by notions of acceptability. Conclusion - It is likely that students are establishing different ethical frames of references when engaging in dishonest behaviours such as rational self-interest or Machiavellianism. The prevention of academic dishonesty and its intervention needs to consider individualised, group-based and institutional processes.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/181353
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.165

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHenning, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorDoherty, Ien_US
dc.contributor.authorHawken, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorRam, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorMalpas, pen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-27T08:08:47Z-
dc.date.available2013-02-27T08:08:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationPharmacy Education, 2011, v. 11 n.1, 2011en_US
dc.identifier.issn1560-2214en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/181353-
dc.description.abstractBackground - Students’ engagement in dishonest behaviours is problematic and may influence future professional practice. Aims - To consider the antecedents predicting engagement in academic dishonesty. Methods - A total of 433 pharmacy and medical students participated in a survey measuring engagement in academic dishonesty, self deception, justification, and acceptability. Hierarchical linear regression and path analysis methods were conducted. Results – Engagement in academic dishonesty was predicted by later years of study, justification, responses to a case scenario and notions of acceptability (R2 = 34%). An appropriately fitted path model showed that each explanatory variable correlated with engagement in academic dishonesty separately rather than being mediated by notions of acceptability. Conclusion - It is likely that students are establishing different ethical frames of references when engaging in dishonest behaviours such as rational self-interest or Machiavellianism. The prevention of academic dishonesty and its intervention needs to consider individualised, group-based and institutional processes.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.titleCan engagement in academic dishonesty be described as planned behaviour or lack of self-control?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailDoherty, I: idoherty@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityDoherty, I=rp01576en_US

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