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Article: Fueling industrial biotechnology growth with bioethanol

TitleFueling industrial biotechnology growth with bioethanol
Authors
Issue Date2007
Citation
Advances In Biochemical Engineering/Biotechnology, 2007, v. 108, p. 1-40 How to Cite?
AbstractIndustrial biotechnology is the conversion of biomass via biocatalysis, microbial fermentation, or cell culture to produce chemicals, materials, and/or energy. Industrial biotechnology processes aim to be cost-competitive, environmentally favorable, and self-sustaining compared to their petrochemical equivalents. Common to all processes for the production of energy, commodity, added value, or fine chemicals is that raw materials comprise the most significant cost fraction, particularly as operating efficiencies increase through practice and improving technologies. Today, crude petroleum represents the dominant raw material for the energy and chemical sectors worldwide. Within the last 5 years petroleum prices, stability, and supply have increased, decreased, and been threatened, respectively, driving a renewed interest across academic, government, and corporate centers to utilize biomass as an alternative raw material. Specifically, bio-based ethanol as an alternative biofuel has emerged as the single largest biotechnology commodity, with close to 46 billion L produced worldwide in 2005. Bioethanol is a leading example of how systems biology tools have significantly enhanced metabolic engineering, inverse metabolic engineering, and protein and enzyme engineering strategies. This enhancement stems from method development for measurement, analysis, and data integration of functional genomics, including the transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, and fluxome. This review will show that future industrial biotechnology process development will benefit tremendously from the precedent set by bioethanol - that enabling technologies (e.g., systems biology tools) coupled with favorable economic and socio-political driving forces do yield profitable, sustainable, and environmentally responsible processes. Biofuel will continue to be the keystone of any industrial biotechnology-based economy whereby biorefineries leverage common raw materials and unit operations to integrate diverse processes to produce demand-driven product portfolios. © 2007 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/181245
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.911
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.527
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOtero, JMen_US
dc.contributor.authorPanagiotou, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorOlsson, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-21T02:03:27Z-
dc.date.available2013-02-21T02:03:27Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationAdvances In Biochemical Engineering/Biotechnology, 2007, v. 108, p. 1-40en_US
dc.identifier.issn0724-6145en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/181245-
dc.description.abstractIndustrial biotechnology is the conversion of biomass via biocatalysis, microbial fermentation, or cell culture to produce chemicals, materials, and/or energy. Industrial biotechnology processes aim to be cost-competitive, environmentally favorable, and self-sustaining compared to their petrochemical equivalents. Common to all processes for the production of energy, commodity, added value, or fine chemicals is that raw materials comprise the most significant cost fraction, particularly as operating efficiencies increase through practice and improving technologies. Today, crude petroleum represents the dominant raw material for the energy and chemical sectors worldwide. Within the last 5 years petroleum prices, stability, and supply have increased, decreased, and been threatened, respectively, driving a renewed interest across academic, government, and corporate centers to utilize biomass as an alternative raw material. Specifically, bio-based ethanol as an alternative biofuel has emerged as the single largest biotechnology commodity, with close to 46 billion L produced worldwide in 2005. Bioethanol is a leading example of how systems biology tools have significantly enhanced metabolic engineering, inverse metabolic engineering, and protein and enzyme engineering strategies. This enhancement stems from method development for measurement, analysis, and data integration of functional genomics, including the transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, and fluxome. This review will show that future industrial biotechnology process development will benefit tremendously from the precedent set by bioethanol - that enabling technologies (e.g., systems biology tools) coupled with favorable economic and socio-political driving forces do yield profitable, sustainable, and environmentally responsible processes. Biofuel will continue to be the keystone of any industrial biotechnology-based economy whereby biorefineries leverage common raw materials and unit operations to integrate diverse processes to produce demand-driven product portfolios. © 2007 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAdvances in Biochemical Engineering/Biotechnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBiotechnology - Trendsen_US
dc.subject.meshEnergy-Generating Resourcesen_US
dc.subject.meshEthanolen_US
dc.subject.meshIndustry - Trendsen_US
dc.titleFueling industrial biotechnology growth with bioethanolen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPanagiotou, G: gipa@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPanagiotou, G=rp01725en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/10_2007_071en_US
dc.identifier.pmid17684710-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34548772960en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34548772960&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume108en_US
dc.identifier.spage1en_US
dc.identifier.epage40en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000250578300001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOtero, JM=9842711900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPanagiotou, G=8566179700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOlsson, L=7203077540en_US

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