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Article: Light-mediated 15N fractionation in Caribbean gorgonian octocorals: Implications for pollution monitoring

TitleLight-mediated 15N fractionation in Caribbean gorgonian octocorals: Implications for pollution monitoring
Authors
KeywordsΔ 15N
Fractionation
Gorgonian
Light
Nitrogen
Pollution
Issue Date2011
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00338/index.htm
Citation
Coral Reefs, 2011, v. 30 n. 3, p. 709-717 How to Cite?
AbstractThe stable nitrogen isotope ratio (δ 15N) of coral tissue is a useful recorder of anthropogenic pollution in tropical marine ecosystems. However, little is known of the natural environmentally induced fractionations that affect our interpretation of coral δ 15N values. In symbiotic scleractinians, light affects metabolic fractionation of N during photosynthesis, which may confound the identification of N pollution between sites of varied depth or turbidity. Given the superiority of octocorals for δ 15N studies, our goal was to quantify the effect of light on gorgonian δ 15N in the context of monitoring N pollution sources. Using field collections, we show that δ 15N declined by 1. 4‰ over 20 m depth in two species of gorgonians, the common sea fan, Gorgonia ventalina, and the slimy sea plume, Pseudopterogorgia americana. An 8-week laboratory experiment with P. americana showed that light, not temperature causes this variation, whereby the lowest fractionation of the N source was observed in the highest light treatment. Finally, we used a yearlong reciprocal depth transplant experiment to quantify the time frame over which δ 15N changes in G. ventalina as a function of light regime. Over the year, δ 15N was unchanged and increased slightly in the deep control colonies and shallow colonies transplanted to the deep site, respectively. Within 6 months, colonies transplanted from deep to shallow became enriched by 0. 8‰, mirroring the enrichment observed in the shallow controls, which was likely due to the combined effect of an increase in the source δ 15N and reduced fractionation. We conclude that light affects gorgonian δ 15N fractionation and should be considered in sampling designs for N pollution monitoring. However, these fractionations are small relative to differences observed between natural and anthropogenic N sources. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180749
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.0
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.724
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBaker, DMen_US
dc.contributor.authorKim, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorAndras, JPen_US
dc.contributor.authorSparks, JPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-28T01:42:15Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-28T01:42:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationCoral Reefs, 2011, v. 30 n. 3, p. 709-717en_US
dc.identifier.issn0722-4028en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180749-
dc.description.abstractThe stable nitrogen isotope ratio (δ 15N) of coral tissue is a useful recorder of anthropogenic pollution in tropical marine ecosystems. However, little is known of the natural environmentally induced fractionations that affect our interpretation of coral δ 15N values. In symbiotic scleractinians, light affects metabolic fractionation of N during photosynthesis, which may confound the identification of N pollution between sites of varied depth or turbidity. Given the superiority of octocorals for δ 15N studies, our goal was to quantify the effect of light on gorgonian δ 15N in the context of monitoring N pollution sources. Using field collections, we show that δ 15N declined by 1. 4‰ over 20 m depth in two species of gorgonians, the common sea fan, Gorgonia ventalina, and the slimy sea plume, Pseudopterogorgia americana. An 8-week laboratory experiment with P. americana showed that light, not temperature causes this variation, whereby the lowest fractionation of the N source was observed in the highest light treatment. Finally, we used a yearlong reciprocal depth transplant experiment to quantify the time frame over which δ 15N changes in G. ventalina as a function of light regime. Over the year, δ 15N was unchanged and increased slightly in the deep control colonies and shallow colonies transplanted to the deep site, respectively. Within 6 months, colonies transplanted from deep to shallow became enriched by 0. 8‰, mirroring the enrichment observed in the shallow controls, which was likely due to the combined effect of an increase in the source δ 15N and reduced fractionation. We conclude that light affects gorgonian δ 15N fractionation and should be considered in sampling designs for N pollution monitoring. However, these fractionations are small relative to differences observed between natural and anthropogenic N sources. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00338/index.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCoral Reefsen_US
dc.subjectΔ 15Nen_US
dc.subjectFractionationen_US
dc.subjectGorgonianen_US
dc.subjectLighten_US
dc.subjectNitrogenen_US
dc.subjectPollutionen_US
dc.titleLight-mediated 15N fractionation in Caribbean gorgonian octocorals: Implications for pollution monitoringen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailBaker, DM: dmbaker@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityBaker, DM=rp01712en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00338-011-0759-xen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79961024956en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79961024956&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume30en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage709en_US
dc.identifier.epage717en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000293536600020-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBaker, DM=55449577100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKim, K=48761555000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAndras, JP=16506208300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSparks, JP=7102297580en_US

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