File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart malformations: Classification based on abnormalities detected by the four-chamber view

TitlePrenatal diagnosis of congenital heart malformations: Classification based on abnormalities detected by the four-chamber view
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/2252
Citation
Prenatal Diagnosis, 1999, v. 19 n. 4, p. 305-313 How to Cite?
AbstractThe aim of the study was to provide logical steps, alternative to the sequential chamber analysis, for diagnosing major congenital heart malformation prenatally. Between 1988 and 1995, of the 14,885 high-risk pregnancies screened at the Departments of Obstetrics and Paediatric Cardiology, University of Hong Kong, 92 fetuses with major congenital heart malformations were detected at 17-36 weeks' gestation (mean = 24.6 weeks) by extended fetal echocardiographic screening. These were classified according to obvious abnormalities related to the partition of the heart or ventricular dimensions depicted by the four-chamber view. Subgrouping according to the presence of normal or abnormal ventriculo-arterial connection, with or without outflow tract anomalies, was further attempted. Five groups were identified: (1) septal defects with all four chambers identified (n = 62, 67 per cent), (2) intact septation with dilatation of either the right or all four chambers of the heart (n = 12, 13 per cent); (3) intact septation with hypoplasia of either one of the ventricles (n = 11, 12 per cent); (4) a rudimentary interventricular septum giving an apparent three-chamber heart (n = 6, 7 per cent); (5) miscellaneous causes (n = 1, 1 per cent). Combined with the information related to the ventricular outflow tracts, the accuracy of arriving at a definitive diagnosis was 97 per cent, when compared with postnatal investigations, surgery and/or autopsies. This simple classification could provide logical steps to arrive at a definitive diagnosis for most major fetal heart malformations.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180643
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.043
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.450
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, MPen_US
dc.contributor.authorTang, MHYen_US
dc.contributor.authorGhosh, Aen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-28T01:40:51Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-28T01:40:51Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.citationPrenatal Diagnosis, 1999, v. 19 n. 4, p. 305-313en_US
dc.identifier.issn0197-3851en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180643-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of the study was to provide logical steps, alternative to the sequential chamber analysis, for diagnosing major congenital heart malformation prenatally. Between 1988 and 1995, of the 14,885 high-risk pregnancies screened at the Departments of Obstetrics and Paediatric Cardiology, University of Hong Kong, 92 fetuses with major congenital heart malformations were detected at 17-36 weeks' gestation (mean = 24.6 weeks) by extended fetal echocardiographic screening. These were classified according to obvious abnormalities related to the partition of the heart or ventricular dimensions depicted by the four-chamber view. Subgrouping according to the presence of normal or abnormal ventriculo-arterial connection, with or without outflow tract anomalies, was further attempted. Five groups were identified: (1) septal defects with all four chambers identified (n = 62, 67 per cent), (2) intact septation with dilatation of either the right or all four chambers of the heart (n = 12, 13 per cent); (3) intact septation with hypoplasia of either one of the ventricles (n = 11, 12 per cent); (4) a rudimentary interventricular septum giving an apparent three-chamber heart (n = 6, 7 per cent); (5) miscellaneous causes (n = 1, 1 per cent). Combined with the information related to the ventricular outflow tracts, the accuracy of arriving at a definitive diagnosis was 97 per cent, when compared with postnatal investigations, surgery and/or autopsies. This simple classification could provide logical steps to arrive at a definitive diagnosis for most major fetal heart malformations.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/2252en_US
dc.relation.ispartofPrenatal Diagnosisen_US
dc.subject.meshDilatation, Pathologic - Ultrasonographyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGestational Ageen_US
dc.subject.meshHeart Defects, Congenital - Classification - Ultrasonographyen_US
dc.subject.meshHeart Septal Defects - Ultrasonographyen_US
dc.subject.meshHeart Ventricles - Abnormalitiesen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_US
dc.subject.meshSensitivity And Specificityen_US
dc.subject.meshUltrasonography, Prenatalen_US
dc.titlePrenatal diagnosis of congenital heart malformations: Classification based on abnormalities detected by the four-chamber viewen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTang, MHY: mhytang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTang, MHY=rp01701en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/(SICI)1097-0223(199904)19:4<305::AID-PD535>3.0.CO;2-Ben_US
dc.identifier.pmid10327133-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032912993en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032912993&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume19en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage305en_US
dc.identifier.epage313en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, MP=7201944800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, MHY=8943401300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGhosh, A=7403963873en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats