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Article: Streamflow variations of the Yellow River over the past 593 years in western China reconstructed from tree rings

TitleStreamflow variations of the Yellow River over the past 593 years in western China reconstructed from tree rings
Authors
Issue Date2007
Citation
Water Resources Research, 2007, v. 43 n. 6 How to Cite?
Abstract[1] Annual streamflow of the Yellow River has decreased in recent years (1980 to 2000) because of climate change and human activity. This decrease affects the environment and the lives of the people in the drainage area. Tree ring width chronologies from six sites in the headwaters of the Yellow River were developed to provide estimates of past Yellow River streamflow in order to place the recent flow reduction in a long-term context. The ring width indices of the six local Juniperus przewalski chronologies correlate significantly with the observed streamflow of the Yellow River recorded at the Tangnaihai hydrological station. Principal components analysis shows that the first principal component (PC) of the tree ring indices explains 49% of the streamflow variance. On the basis of this result, Yellow River streamflow was reconstructed for the past 593 years. Several severe droughts and low-flow events are recognized in the decades 1920-1930, 1820-1830, 1700-1710, 1590-1600, and 1480-1490. The most severe droughts in 1480-1490 were also recorded in other studies on the Tibetan Plateau. Regional historical climate archives further support the validity of our streamflow reconstruction. The reconstructed increase in streamflow during much of the twentieth century also coincides with generally wetter conditions in the Tienshan and Qilianshan Mountains of China, as well as in northern Pakistan and Mongolia. After the 1980s, our reconstruction indicates a decreasing trend in streamflow, which is cause for concern. Presently, Yellow River streamflow is relatively low but not yet outside the range of streamflow fluctuations that occurred during the past six centuries. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180539
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.792
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.661
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGou, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorCook, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorJacoby, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-28T01:39:42Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-28T01:39:42Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationWater Resources Research, 2007, v. 43 n. 6en_US
dc.identifier.issn0043-1397en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180539-
dc.description.abstract[1] Annual streamflow of the Yellow River has decreased in recent years (1980 to 2000) because of climate change and human activity. This decrease affects the environment and the lives of the people in the drainage area. Tree ring width chronologies from six sites in the headwaters of the Yellow River were developed to provide estimates of past Yellow River streamflow in order to place the recent flow reduction in a long-term context. The ring width indices of the six local Juniperus przewalski chronologies correlate significantly with the observed streamflow of the Yellow River recorded at the Tangnaihai hydrological station. Principal components analysis shows that the first principal component (PC) of the tree ring indices explains 49% of the streamflow variance. On the basis of this result, Yellow River streamflow was reconstructed for the past 593 years. Several severe droughts and low-flow events are recognized in the decades 1920-1930, 1820-1830, 1700-1710, 1590-1600, and 1480-1490. The most severe droughts in 1480-1490 were also recorded in other studies on the Tibetan Plateau. Regional historical climate archives further support the validity of our streamflow reconstruction. The reconstructed increase in streamflow during much of the twentieth century also coincides with generally wetter conditions in the Tienshan and Qilianshan Mountains of China, as well as in northern Pakistan and Mongolia. After the 1980s, our reconstruction indicates a decreasing trend in streamflow, which is cause for concern. Presently, Yellow River streamflow is relatively low but not yet outside the range of streamflow fluctuations that occurred during the past six centuries. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofWater Resources Researchen_US
dc.titleStreamflow variations of the Yellow River over the past 593 years in western China reconstructed from tree ringsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, J: jinbao@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLi, J=rp01699en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2006WR005705en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34547146907en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34547146907&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume43en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000247698100007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGou, X=7003498424en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, F=7404907075en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCook, E=7202259586en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJacoby, G=7102248701en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, M=7404925844en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, J=35272482700en_US

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