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Article: Temporary crises and priority changes: The case of state substance abuse systems

TitleTemporary crises and priority changes: The case of state substance abuse systems
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://jpart.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Journal Of Public Administration Research And Theory, 2010, v. 20 n. 3, p. 539-575 How to Cite?
AbstractMany doubts have been expressed about the capacity of states to administer federally supported social service programs. This article relies on institutional theory, punctuated equilibrium theory, and evidence from two states to analyze the way states administer the programs in times of fiscal crisis. The particular context is the fiscal crisis of the early 2000s in substance abuse programs. The analysis suggest that, during the crisis, state administrative authorities and the providers they funded refocused services on federal rather than local priorities. The states and providers also further integrated substance abuse services with the services of other programs and promoted managerial practices that seemed to loosen the match between services and clients. The findings point to some of the ways in which the states' capacities to respond to crises can be undermined by the national trend toward encouraging state discretion. Findings also reveal challenges for state-level crisis management. © The Author 2009.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180509
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.893
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.400
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSosin, MRen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, SRen_US
dc.contributor.authorHilton, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorJordan, LPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-28T01:39:08Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-28T01:39:08Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Public Administration Research And Theory, 2010, v. 20 n. 3, p. 539-575en_US
dc.identifier.issn1053-1858en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180509-
dc.description.abstractMany doubts have been expressed about the capacity of states to administer federally supported social service programs. This article relies on institutional theory, punctuated equilibrium theory, and evidence from two states to analyze the way states administer the programs in times of fiscal crisis. The particular context is the fiscal crisis of the early 2000s in substance abuse programs. The analysis suggest that, during the crisis, state administrative authorities and the providers they funded refocused services on federal rather than local priorities. The states and providers also further integrated substance abuse services with the services of other programs and promoted managerial practices that seemed to loosen the match between services and clients. The findings point to some of the ways in which the states' capacities to respond to crises can be undermined by the national trend toward encouraging state discretion. Findings also reveal challenges for state-level crisis management. © The Author 2009.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://jpart.oxfordjournals.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Public Administration Research and Theoryen_US
dc.titleTemporary crises and priority changes: The case of state substance abuse systemsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailJordan, LP: jordanlp@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityJordan, LP=rp01707en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/jopart/mup022en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77954390661en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77954390661&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume20en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage539en_US
dc.identifier.epage575en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000279466500001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSosin, MR=7004251536en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSmith, SR=35352731100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHilton, T=36163062500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJordan, LP=36163401400en_US

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