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Article: Understanding wetland plant dynamics in response to water table changes through ecohydrological modelling

TitleUnderstanding wetland plant dynamics in response to water table changes through ecohydrological modelling
Authors
KeywordsCompetition
Drawdown
Groundwater
Herbaceous Plants
Succession
Vegetation
Wetland
Issue Date2013
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-ECO.html
Citation
Ecohydrology, 2013, v. 6 n. 2, p. 287-296 How to Cite?
AbstractVulnerability of wetland vegetation to water table changes is a widely studied topic in the field of ecology. Extreme flood or drought conditions imposed on wetlands cause disappearance of plants or shift in the vegetation regime. The recovery of such plant compositions is of particular importance when the wetland is subjected to frequent water table fluctuations resulting from land use changes and requires knowledge of mechanisms underlying evolution of plant growth to changing hydrologic conditions. We used a spatially varying, coupled groundwater-vegetation growth model to investigate the survival mechanism of wetland herbaceous plants. The plants were subjected to long-term water table drainage because of land use changes that caused the disappearance of one of the species composition. In an effort to revive the disappeared species, hypothetical soil saturation was introduced onto the study domain through elevated water table level. Even though the system had returned to hydrologically favourable environment, the disappeared species was unable to recover, which in turn led to the evaluation of factors that determine the re-emergence of the species through sensitivity analysis. The results of the sensitivity analysis showed that the disappeared species recovered during scenarios of reduced duration of drawdown, increased assimilation rates and increased competitiveness. The analysis also showed that the competitiveness of the plants, which was modelled by the classic Lotka-Volterra algorithm, supersedes any of the unfavourable plant growth characteristics. The results of this study demonstrated the ability of the groundwater-vegetation response model to facilitate an understanding of plant development and a hierarchy of important factors that promote their growth in altered hydrologic conditions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180441
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.138
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.213
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPalanisamy, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorChui, TFMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-28T01:37:58Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-28T01:37:58Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationEcohydrology, 2013, v. 6 n. 2, p. 287-296en_US
dc.identifier.issn1936-0584en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180441-
dc.description.abstractVulnerability of wetland vegetation to water table changes is a widely studied topic in the field of ecology. Extreme flood or drought conditions imposed on wetlands cause disappearance of plants or shift in the vegetation regime. The recovery of such plant compositions is of particular importance when the wetland is subjected to frequent water table fluctuations resulting from land use changes and requires knowledge of mechanisms underlying evolution of plant growth to changing hydrologic conditions. We used a spatially varying, coupled groundwater-vegetation growth model to investigate the survival mechanism of wetland herbaceous plants. The plants were subjected to long-term water table drainage because of land use changes that caused the disappearance of one of the species composition. In an effort to revive the disappeared species, hypothetical soil saturation was introduced onto the study domain through elevated water table level. Even though the system had returned to hydrologically favourable environment, the disappeared species was unable to recover, which in turn led to the evaluation of factors that determine the re-emergence of the species through sensitivity analysis. The results of the sensitivity analysis showed that the disappeared species recovered during scenarios of reduced duration of drawdown, increased assimilation rates and increased competitiveness. The analysis also showed that the competitiveness of the plants, which was modelled by the classic Lotka-Volterra algorithm, supersedes any of the unfavourable plant growth characteristics. The results of this study demonstrated the ability of the groundwater-vegetation response model to facilitate an understanding of plant development and a hierarchy of important factors that promote their growth in altered hydrologic conditions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-ECO.html-
dc.relation.ispartofEcohydrologyen_US
dc.subjectCompetitionen_US
dc.subjectDrawdownen_US
dc.subjectGroundwateren_US
dc.subjectHerbaceous Plantsen_US
dc.subjectSuccessionen_US
dc.subjectVegetationen_US
dc.subjectWetlanden_US
dc.titleUnderstanding wetland plant dynamics in response to water table changes through ecohydrological modellingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChui, TFM: maychui@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChui, TFM=rp01696en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/eco.1268en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84876327839en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros230994-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000317676600012-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPalanisamy, B=55183840700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChui, TFM=24723787700en_US

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