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postgraduate thesis: Family dinner and youth risk behaviors

TitleFamily dinner and youth risk behaviors
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Wong, N. M. [王雅穎]. (2012). Family dinner and youth risk behaviors. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4842625
AbstractBackground: Adolescent risk behaviors are important public health problems worldwide. They can lead to significant mortalities and morbidities. Common and important adolescent risk behaviors include tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, drug abuse, dating, sexual activity, suicide, participation in fighting and gambling. Various factors were studied on the association with youth risk behaviors. Families, schools and communities play important roles. Having meals with families have been shown to be associated with less risk behaviors in youths in other studies. However, there is no study on the association between family dinner and youth risk behaviors in Hong Kong. Objectives: The objectives of the current study are to test for any association between the frequency of family dinner and youth risk behaviors and to raise the public awareness of the importance of youth risk behaviors and the associated factors. Methods: The data in the current study was extracted from the Child Health Survey (CHS) conducted in 2005/2006. The CHS was commissioned by the Surveillance and Epidemiology Branch Centre for Health Protection under Department of Health. Children in the age group of 11 to 14 years old were included in this study. In CHS, self-administered questionnaires including Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ) which were validated were completed by the parent. For children of 11 to 14 years of age, except those who were mentally handicapped, data on quality of life, psychological assessment and risk behaviors were collected through a separate face-to-face interview and a self- administered questionnaire in Chinese. The association between number of family dinners per week and youth problems including smoking, alcohol drinking, drug abuse, dating, sexual experience, suicidal ideation, participation in fighting and gambling were tested using univariate analysis. Risk behaviors found to be significantly associated with frequency of family dinner were further tested by adjustment of possible confounders using logistic regression. Results: Family dinner of 3 times or more per week was associated with less alcohol drinking, dating and participation in fighting. Alcohol drinking, sexual experience and peer smoking were significantly associated with youth smoking. Youth alcohol drinking was found to be associated with smoking, dating, gambling and externalization problem. Smoking and alcohol drinking were significantly associated with dating. Alcohol drinking, drug abuse, participation in fighting, anxiety and depression problem were associated with suicidal ideation. Suicidal ideation, gambling, anxiety and depression problem, and externalization problem were significantly associated with participation in fighting. Factors associated with youth gambling included alcohol drinking, suicidal ideation and participation in fighting. Conclusion: Family dinner is likely to be a protective factor against certain youth risk behaviors, including alcohol drinking, youth dating and participation in fighting. It should be promoted to all families in Hong Kong. Youth risk behaviors were inter-related. Detection of one youth risk problem should prompt the detection of other risk problems.
DegreeMaster of Public Health
SubjectRisk-taking (Psychology) in adolescence.
Teenagers - Family relationships.
Dept/ProgramPublic Health

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, Nga-wing, Maria.-
dc.contributor.author王雅穎.-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationWong, N. M. [王雅穎]. (2012). Family dinner and youth risk behaviors. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4842625-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Adolescent risk behaviors are important public health problems worldwide. They can lead to significant mortalities and morbidities. Common and important adolescent risk behaviors include tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, drug abuse, dating, sexual activity, suicide, participation in fighting and gambling. Various factors were studied on the association with youth risk behaviors. Families, schools and communities play important roles. Having meals with families have been shown to be associated with less risk behaviors in youths in other studies. However, there is no study on the association between family dinner and youth risk behaviors in Hong Kong. Objectives: The objectives of the current study are to test for any association between the frequency of family dinner and youth risk behaviors and to raise the public awareness of the importance of youth risk behaviors and the associated factors. Methods: The data in the current study was extracted from the Child Health Survey (CHS) conducted in 2005/2006. The CHS was commissioned by the Surveillance and Epidemiology Branch Centre for Health Protection under Department of Health. Children in the age group of 11 to 14 years old were included in this study. In CHS, self-administered questionnaires including Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ) which were validated were completed by the parent. For children of 11 to 14 years of age, except those who were mentally handicapped, data on quality of life, psychological assessment and risk behaviors were collected through a separate face-to-face interview and a self- administered questionnaire in Chinese. The association between number of family dinners per week and youth problems including smoking, alcohol drinking, drug abuse, dating, sexual experience, suicidal ideation, participation in fighting and gambling were tested using univariate analysis. Risk behaviors found to be significantly associated with frequency of family dinner were further tested by adjustment of possible confounders using logistic regression. Results: Family dinner of 3 times or more per week was associated with less alcohol drinking, dating and participation in fighting. Alcohol drinking, sexual experience and peer smoking were significantly associated with youth smoking. Youth alcohol drinking was found to be associated with smoking, dating, gambling and externalization problem. Smoking and alcohol drinking were significantly associated with dating. Alcohol drinking, drug abuse, participation in fighting, anxiety and depression problem were associated with suicidal ideation. Suicidal ideation, gambling, anxiety and depression problem, and externalization problem were significantly associated with participation in fighting. Factors associated with youth gambling included alcohol drinking, suicidal ideation and participation in fighting. Conclusion: Family dinner is likely to be a protective factor against certain youth risk behaviors, including alcohol drinking, youth dating and participation in fighting. It should be promoted to all families in Hong Kong. Youth risk behaviors were inter-related. Detection of one youth risk problem should prompt the detection of other risk problems.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B48426258-
dc.subject.lcshRisk-taking (Psychology) in adolescence.-
dc.subject.lcshTeenagers - Family relationships.-
dc.titleFamily dinner and youth risk behaviors-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb4842625-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Public Health-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplinePublic Health-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b4842625-
dc.date.hkucongregation2012-

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