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postgraduate thesis: Job satisfaction, stress and mental wellbeing of health care workers in a regional public hospital

TitleJob satisfaction, stress and mental wellbeing of health care workers in a regional public hospital
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Chan, Y. [陳遠欣]. (2012). Job satisfaction, stress and mental wellbeing of health care workers in a regional public hospital. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4842250
AbstractIntroduction: Amongst all public servants in Hong Kong, health care workers are one of the groups suffering from highest working pressure. They have long working hours and may have overnight shift duties, including Sundays or even public holidays. This may lead to poor job satisfaction, psychological stress and the recent high resignation rate in public hospitals. The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of the psychological stress, psychological symptoms and job satisfaction of health care workers, the association between stress, psychological symptoms and job satisfaction; and also the factors associated with job satisfaction in a regional hospital in Hong Kong. Method: Health care workers in a large regional hospital of Hong Kong were surveyed by means of a questionnaire assessing basic demographic data, questions of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Warr-Cook and Wall job satisfaction scale (JSS). Four groups of health care workers (doctors, nurses, allied health workers and supporting staffs) were surveyed. Summary of descriptive statistics were calculated for each group to compare the prevalence of job dissatisfaction, perceived stress, and psychological symptoms. Two-stage analysis will be used. The first stage analysis will use ANOVA test to access the association between job satisfaction and different variables. The second stage analysis will use multivariate regression model to further assess the coefficient correlation of significant factors drawn from ANOVA test with job satisfaction. Results: There were 674 eligible questionnaires. About half (47%) of the health care workers reported having perceived stress and a third (33.8%) psychological symptoms. Doctors reported the (76.8%, 95% C.I = 69.43%, 84.17%) highest level of job satisfaction amongst all the health care workers surveyed. Among staff reporting a GHQ score equal to or more than three, supportive staff had significantly higher prevalence (38.7%, 95% C.I.=27.96%, 49.44%) and doctors the lowest prevalence (28.1%, 95% C.I.= 15.11%, 41.09%) of psychological symptom but proportions were compatible with their counterparts in other countries. The mean score for GHQ-12 was 2.41+/- S.D. 3.28. The overall mean perceived stress score was 18.14 with SD +/- 5.0. There was no significant difference when different subgroups were compared. The mean PSS scores of all subgroups were lower than their counterparts in other counties but were quite similar to the mean PSS reported during SARS period. Sixty eight percent of all health care workers surveyed were satisfied with their job (respondents indicating “moderately satisfied”, “very satisfied” and “extremely satisfied” on their overall job satisfaction). Values equal to or above 5 reflect being satisfied. The mean value for Job satisfaction was 4.58 +/-S.D. 1.21. The factors including shift duty, perceived stress, and psychological symptoms were negative correlated with job satisfaction. Factors such as clinical work, doctor and secondary school level were positive correlate with job satisfaction. Conclusion: Prevalence of perceived stress and psychological symptoms among health care workers were high when compared with the general population (14-17.6% for perceived stress and 28.1% for psychological symptom), but not as high as expected. In contrast to popular belief, doctors had the lowest perceived stress level, lowest prevalence of psychological symptom and the highest job satisfaction among different groups of health care workers. This may be related to higher income, social status and, education background that might help to protect them from depression and anxiety. Supportive staffs, who felt neglected by management, were found to have the highest prevalence of psychological symptom and higher stress levels. Nurses got highest prevalence of perceived stress. More attentions and resources should be devoted to these groups to cope with their psychological needs and stress.
DegreeMaster of Public Health
SubjectMedical personnel - Job satisfaction - China - Hong Kong.
Medical personnel - Job stress - China - Hong Kong.
Medical personnel - China - Hong Kong - Psychology.
Dept/ProgramPublic Health

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, Yuen-yan.-
dc.contributor.author陳遠欣.-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationChan, Y. [陳遠欣]. (2012). Job satisfaction, stress and mental wellbeing of health care workers in a regional public hospital. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4842250-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Amongst all public servants in Hong Kong, health care workers are one of the groups suffering from highest working pressure. They have long working hours and may have overnight shift duties, including Sundays or even public holidays. This may lead to poor job satisfaction, psychological stress and the recent high resignation rate in public hospitals. The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of the psychological stress, psychological symptoms and job satisfaction of health care workers, the association between stress, psychological symptoms and job satisfaction; and also the factors associated with job satisfaction in a regional hospital in Hong Kong. Method: Health care workers in a large regional hospital of Hong Kong were surveyed by means of a questionnaire assessing basic demographic data, questions of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Warr-Cook and Wall job satisfaction scale (JSS). Four groups of health care workers (doctors, nurses, allied health workers and supporting staffs) were surveyed. Summary of descriptive statistics were calculated for each group to compare the prevalence of job dissatisfaction, perceived stress, and psychological symptoms. Two-stage analysis will be used. The first stage analysis will use ANOVA test to access the association between job satisfaction and different variables. The second stage analysis will use multivariate regression model to further assess the coefficient correlation of significant factors drawn from ANOVA test with job satisfaction. Results: There were 674 eligible questionnaires. About half (47%) of the health care workers reported having perceived stress and a third (33.8%) psychological symptoms. Doctors reported the (76.8%, 95% C.I = 69.43%, 84.17%) highest level of job satisfaction amongst all the health care workers surveyed. Among staff reporting a GHQ score equal to or more than three, supportive staff had significantly higher prevalence (38.7%, 95% C.I.=27.96%, 49.44%) and doctors the lowest prevalence (28.1%, 95% C.I.= 15.11%, 41.09%) of psychological symptom but proportions were compatible with their counterparts in other countries. The mean score for GHQ-12 was 2.41+/- S.D. 3.28. The overall mean perceived stress score was 18.14 with SD +/- 5.0. There was no significant difference when different subgroups were compared. The mean PSS scores of all subgroups were lower than their counterparts in other counties but were quite similar to the mean PSS reported during SARS period. Sixty eight percent of all health care workers surveyed were satisfied with their job (respondents indicating “moderately satisfied”, “very satisfied” and “extremely satisfied” on their overall job satisfaction). Values equal to or above 5 reflect being satisfied. The mean value for Job satisfaction was 4.58 +/-S.D. 1.21. The factors including shift duty, perceived stress, and psychological symptoms were negative correlated with job satisfaction. Factors such as clinical work, doctor and secondary school level were positive correlate with job satisfaction. Conclusion: Prevalence of perceived stress and psychological symptoms among health care workers were high when compared with the general population (14-17.6% for perceived stress and 28.1% for psychological symptom), but not as high as expected. In contrast to popular belief, doctors had the lowest perceived stress level, lowest prevalence of psychological symptom and the highest job satisfaction among different groups of health care workers. This may be related to higher income, social status and, education background that might help to protect them from depression and anxiety. Supportive staffs, who felt neglected by management, were found to have the highest prevalence of psychological symptom and higher stress levels. Nurses got highest prevalence of perceived stress. More attentions and resources should be devoted to these groups to cope with their psychological needs and stress.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B48422502-
dc.subject.lcshMedical personnel - Job satisfaction - China - Hong Kong.-
dc.subject.lcshMedical personnel - Job stress - China - Hong Kong.-
dc.subject.lcshMedical personnel - China - Hong Kong - Psychology.-
dc.titleJob satisfaction, stress and mental wellbeing of health care workers in a regional public hospital-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb4842250-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Public Health-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplinePublic Health-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b4842250-
dc.date.hkucongregation2012-

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