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postgraduate thesis: Autobiographical memory specificity and depression

TitleAutobiographical memory specificity and depression
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Cheung, S. [張嬋玲]. (2010). Autobiographical memory specificity and depression. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4765698
AbstractReduced autobiographical memory specificity is considered to be a vulnerability factor for depression and is a significant predictor of the course of depression. Previous studies have shown that different natures of rumination (abstract versus concrete) have different effects on autobiographical memory specificity. Knowing more about the relationship among depression, rumination, and autobiographical memory specificity is important for understanding the cognitive biases in depression. This study explored whether rumination of different valences had different effects on autobiographical memory specificity in participants with major depressive disorder. A 2 (group: MDD, control) x 2 (rumination: positive, negative) x 2 (time: pre, post) mixed design was used. Fifty-two currently depressed people and 52 nonpsychiatric controls completed this experiment. They did the Autobiographical Memory Test and the mood ratings before and after either the positive or the negative rumination task. In the rumination task, they were requested to focus their attention on some specific thoughts about themselves. Results showed a significant group (depressed, control) x time (pre, post) interaction effect for the number of specific memories. This was a result of a significant decrease in specific memories retrieved after negative rumination in the depressed group, but not after positive rumination. No significant result was found among the nonpsychiatric controls. These findings seem to be related to the inhibitory deficit of depressed people in keeping task-irrelevant negative materials from the working memory. Therefore, the working memory capacity is lowered and fewer specific memories are retrieved.
DegreeDoctor of Psychology
SubjectAutobiographical memory.
Depression.
Dept/ProgramClinical Psychology

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Sim-ling.-
dc.contributor.author張嬋玲.-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationCheung, S. [張嬋玲]. (2010). Autobiographical memory specificity and depression. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4765698-
dc.description.abstractReduced autobiographical memory specificity is considered to be a vulnerability factor for depression and is a significant predictor of the course of depression. Previous studies have shown that different natures of rumination (abstract versus concrete) have different effects on autobiographical memory specificity. Knowing more about the relationship among depression, rumination, and autobiographical memory specificity is important for understanding the cognitive biases in depression. This study explored whether rumination of different valences had different effects on autobiographical memory specificity in participants with major depressive disorder. A 2 (group: MDD, control) x 2 (rumination: positive, negative) x 2 (time: pre, post) mixed design was used. Fifty-two currently depressed people and 52 nonpsychiatric controls completed this experiment. They did the Autobiographical Memory Test and the mood ratings before and after either the positive or the negative rumination task. In the rumination task, they were requested to focus their attention on some specific thoughts about themselves. Results showed a significant group (depressed, control) x time (pre, post) interaction effect for the number of specific memories. This was a result of a significant decrease in specific memories retrieved after negative rumination in the depressed group, but not after positive rumination. No significant result was found among the nonpsychiatric controls. These findings seem to be related to the inhibitory deficit of depressed people in keeping task-irrelevant negative materials from the working memory. Therefore, the working memory capacity is lowered and fewer specific memories are retrieved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B47656980-
dc.subject.lcshAutobiographical memory.-
dc.subject.lcshDepression.-
dc.titleAutobiographical memory specificity and depression-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb4765698-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Psychology-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineClinical Psychology-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b4765698-
dc.date.hkucongregation2011-

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